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Chapter 7 Rail Services

Scottish Transport Statistics No 32 2013 Edition

Chapter 7 Rail Services

1. Introduction

1.1 This chapter provides information on rail services, such as the numbers of passenger journeys of various types, passenger receipts, punctuality and passenger satisfaction, the amount of freight lifted by origin, destination and commodity, lines open for traffic, number of stations, railway accidents, and some statistics about the Glasgow Subway.

1.2 For simplicity, the Scottish passenger rail franchise is referred to throughout as ScotRail. From 31 March 1997 to 16 October 2004, it was operated by National Express, under the name ScotRail; from 17 October 2004, it has been operated by First Group, under the name First ScotRail.

1.3 ScotRail introduced a new methodology which better estimates Strathclyde Zonecard journeys from 2009/10. To allow meaningful year on year comparisons to be made passenger figures from 2003/04 onwards present the impact on previously published figures. Note that Office of Rail Regulation figures are compiled on a different basis and do not adjust for this.

Key Points

There were 83 million passenger journeys on Scotrail services in 2012-13

Scotland has 2,763kms of rail network and 349 stations.

28% of respondents to the Scottish Household Survey had used the train in the last month in 2012.

2. Main Points

Journeys & Trends

2.1 Passenger journeys on ScotRail services increased by 2.7% to 83.3 million in the 2012-13 financial year, an increase of 30% since 2004-05 (Table 7.1).

2.2 Office of Rail Regulation (ORR) data has been revised since the publication of STS 2012. The revised data show there were 83.3 million rail passenger journeys originating in Scotland in the 2011-12 financial year. This was around 3.9 million (5%) more than the previous year. Following a fall in the early 1990's, passenger numbers increased in every year after 1994-95, to 64.9 million in 1999-2000. However, they fell by 0.1 million in 2000-01 due to the effects on rail services of the speed restrictions, imposed following the accident at Hatfield in October 2000 (e.g. the Edinburgh/Glasgow daytime frequency was halved for about two months, and some sleeper services did not run for about five months). There were falls of 0.2 million in 2001-02 and 0.6 million in 2002-03 due to the effects on services of the ScotRail drivers' pay dispute, including some one day strikes and a special timetable (involving a reduction of about a quarter in weekday services) from January to May 2002. Subsequently, patronage recovered, with increases from 2004-05 onwards. (Table H1). (Table 7.2)

2.3 ORR data also shows 3.8 million cross-border passenger journeys originating outwith Scotland in 2011-12, 0.1 million more than in 2010-11. Cross-border passenger journeys originating outwith Scotland had been increasing since 1994-95 (2.1 million),. However, they fell slightly in 2000-01 and 2002-03 due to the reasons referred to above. (Table 7.3)

2.4 Passenger revenue from journeys originating in Scotland was £393 million in 2011-12 of which cross-border journeys originating in Scotland accounted for £136 million (Table 7.2). A similar amount (£136m) of passenger revenue was generated from passenger journeys originating outwith Scotland and ending in Scotland. (Table 7.3)

Journey Stages & Distances

2.5 Tables 7.4 to 7.8 show ORR passenger journeys. In 2011-12, 91% of the 87 million passenger journeys to, from or within Scotland were solely within Scotland. The North East and North West of England and London were the main origins/destinations of cross-border passenger journeys with around 2 million journeys each (Table 7.4).

2.6 In 2009-10 51% of passenger journeys to Aberdeen involved travelling distances of 100+ kms, 37% of journeys to Edinburgh were between 50 kms and 100 kms, and 29% of journeys to Glasgow were between 5 kms and 10 kms. Updates to this dataset are not currently available. (Table 7.5)

2.7 In 2011-12, there were 79.5 million passenger journeys, wholly within Scotland. Forty per cent of start and end points were in Glasgow and 12 per cent were in Edinburgh. There were 7.6 million cross border journeys starting or finishing in Scotland. Of these, 46 per cent started or finished in Edinburgh and a quarter started or finished in Glasgow. (Table 7.6a and 7.6b)

2.8 Table 7.6c shows travel between Local Authorities in 2011-12 and previous years (replacing those published in previous versions of STS as the methodology has been revised). Of the journeys wholly within Scotland, 12 million (15%) start and finish in Glasgow. Over 6 million are made between Glasgow and North and South Lanarkshire. (Table 7.6c)

Stations

2.9 In 2011-12, Glasgow Central was the busiest national rail station in Scotland, with 27 million passenger journeys. Edinburgh Waverley was used by 23 million passengers, Glasgow Queen Street by 21 million, Paisley Gilmour Street by 3.6 million, Aberdeen by 3.2 million, Partick by 2.5 million, Stirling by 2.3 million, Haymarket by 2.1 million, Charing Cross by 2 million Dundee by 1.7 million and Ayr by 1.5 million. Including those already listed, there were 72 stations for which more than half a million passenger journeys each were recorded in the national ticketing system. (Table 7.7)

2.10 Of the stations in Scotland which have opened (or re-opened) since 1970 Exhibition Centre (1,318,000), Argyle Street (1,197,000), Bathgate (871,000), Livingston North (826,000), Dyce (678,000), Anderston (647,000), Edinburgh Park (646,000), South Gyle (514,000) and Bridgeton (489,000), had the largest passenger volumes in 2011-12. (Table 7.8)

Punctuality & Service

2.11 In 2012-13 93.0% of ScotRail services and 83.6% of Virgin trains arrived on time. 86.8% of Cross Country and 83.9% of East Coast were on time. For all GB long-distance operators it was 87.1% and for all GB regional operators it was 91.6%. (Table 7.9)

2.12 In 2012-13, 97.3% of ScotRail trains arrived within 10 minutes of the scheduled arrival time, 1.0% arrived 20 or more minutes late, and 1.4% were cancelled. (Table 7.10)

2.13 In 2012, 89% of ScotRail passengers were either satisfied or said good when asked their opinion of their overall journey. The equivalent figure was 87% for non-ScotRail passengers whose journeys started in Scotland and 86% for all GB regional operators and 88% for all GB long-distance operators. The table shows ScotRail passengers' ratings of 14 aspects of service: in 2012, there were 12 for which at least 75% of those surveyed were satisfied, or said good. (Table 7.11)

2.14 The Scottish Household Survey also collects data from Scottish households on satisfaction with rail services. In 2012, around 90% were satisfied with train services offered, their timeliness and frequency and ability to find out about tickets and routes. There were noticeable differences in those who felt safe of the train during the day and in the evening (day: 97%, evening: 77%). 'Fares are good value' had the lowest agreement rate for trains with 51% of respondents doing so. (Table 7.20)

Rail Freight

2.15 In 2011-12, 7.6 million tonnes of freight was lifted in Scotland by rail, 9% less than the previous year, and half the level of the 2005-06 peak. Of all freight lifted in Scotland, 29% was delivered elsewhere within the UK and about 5% was delivered outwith the UK (because of the way that the statistics are compiled, this figure includes freight for export which was delivered to a port in Britain, as well as Channel Tunnel traffic).

2.16 The amount of freight lifted in Scotland with a destination in Scotland increased by 50% between 2001-02 and a peak in 2007-08 and are currently 20 per cent below this level. In 2011-12, coal and other minerals accounted for 4.2 million tonnes (55%) of the freight lifted in Scotland. Dividing the number of tonne-kilometres by the number of tonnes gives an average length of haul of 199 kilometres for traffic remaining in Scotland, 332 kilometres for traffic to other parts of the UK, and 716 kilometres for traffic destined for outwith the UK. (Table 7.12)

2.17 A total of 1.07 million tonnes of freight lifted elsewhere in the UK was delivered in Scotland in 2011-12, along with 0.41 million tonnes of freight from outwith the UK (the latter figure includes imported freight which was lifted at ports in England or Wales). The total amount of freight with a destination in Scotland fell by 6%, from 6.90 million tonnes in 2010-11 to 6.51 million tonnes in 2011-12, the reduction is a result of a fall in freight lifted in the UK. (Table 7.13)

Railway Network

2.18 The total route length of the railway network in Scotland is 2,763 kilometres, of which 676 kilometres is electrified. These figures do not represent the total length of railway track: a kilometre of single-track and a kilometre of double-track both count as one kilometre of route length. (Table 7.14)

2.19 The number of passenger stations has increased from 336 in 2001-02 to 351 in 2011-12. (Table 7.15)

2.20 The local authorities which had the largest numbers of stations located in their areas in 2010 were Glasgow (61) and Highland (59). Two mainland councils did not have any stations in their areas: Midlothian and Scottish Borders. (Table 7.16)

Subway

2.21 On the Glasgow Subway, the number of passenger journeys has fallen 2 per cent between 2011-12 and 2012-13 and 13 per cent from a 2007-2008 peak. Passenger receipts (excluding other revenue) were £12.6 million in 2012-13, 11% less in cash terms, and 14% less in real terms, than in the previous year. (Table 7.17)

Accidents

2.22 The number of train accidents fell from 47 to 35 in 2012. Collisions with level crossings and other obstructions fell from 31 in 2011 to 29 in 2012. There were no deaths or injuries due to train accidents. There were 125 injuries occurring on railway premises which was half the number in 2002-03. (Table 7.18)

2.23 The total number of fatalities was 33, of which 27 were suicides and 6 were trespassers. (Table 7.19)

3. Notes and Definitions

3.1 All the statistics are based on the sales of tickets, with the rail industry's central ticketing system (formerly called CAPRI - Computer Analysis of Passenger Revenue Information, now replaced and renamed LENNON - Latest Earnings Nationally Networked Over Night) being the source of most of the figures. LENNON holds information on all national rail tickets purchased in Great Britain. They do not include journeys made by people without tickets, by railway staff using special passes, and by blind people under a free concessionary travel scheme. A single ticket is counted as one passenger journey, a return ticket is counted as two passenger journeys (one in each direction), and the number of journeys made by holders of season tickets is estimated from the sales of such tickets, using the standard factors for season tickets of various lengths which are adopted for the production of National Rail passenger statistics. There is multiple counting when a passenger uses more than one ticket to make a journey (e.g. a journey from A to B, and then on to C, using a separate single ticket for each of the journey stages would be counted as two passenger journeys)

3.2 LENNON does not record directly sales of certain products, including:

  • some operator-specific tickets;
  • some types of promotional fares (such as two for the price of one) and combined rail plus add-on tickets (e.g. covering a journey by rail and admission to an attraction);

3.3 Figures for Scotland are produced on two different bases (due to differences in the available information). In ascending order of size, they are:

3.4 ORR Passenger journeys: these figures are produced by adding together:

  • the numbers of passenger journeys made using national rail tickets - produced from LENNON information about national rail ticket sales, as described in the previous paragraph; and
  • estimates of the numbers of certain types of passenger journey that are not recorded directly by LENNON, such as those which are made using some types of promotional fares, combined rail plus add-on tickets, and multi-modal travelcard type tickets, such as the SPT Zonecard
  • ORR figures include estimates of zonecard trips using a slightly different basis to ScotRail estimates and therefore figures are not comparable.

3.5 ScotRail passenger train journey stages: these figures are produced from:

  • data which have been subject to the ORCATS process (Operational Research Computer Allocation of Tickets to Services). This uses the national rail ticket sales information from LENNON to allocate the revenue from a passenger's ticket to the Train Operating Companies (TOCs) which provide the services on the route or routes which were used for the passenger's journey. In the ORCATS process, a passenger journey that would involve a change of train is counted against each of the trains that would be used in the course of that journey.
  • For example, a journey made using a through single ticket from North Berwick to Carlisle would be counted twice, to reflect the fact that the passenger would use one train from North Berwick to Edinburgh, and then change at Edinburgh to another train to Carlisle. This is done in order that the revenue relating to the ticket can be allocated pro rata to the operators of the different trains used in the course of the journey. Therefore, figures r in Table 7.1 represent the numbers of different trains used in the course of journeys on ScotRail services, not the actual numbers of journeys made (hence differs from the ORR).
  • estimates of the numbers of journeys (or parts of journeys) made using tickets (such as Zonecards) whose sales are not recorded directly by LENNON (some of these estimates are added after the allocation process)
  • ScotRail revised its methodology to better estimate Strathclyde Zonecard journeys from 2009/10. To allow meaningful year on year comparisons to be made passenger figures from 2003/04 onwards present the impact on previously published figures. Note that Office of Rail Regulation figures are compiled on a different basis and do not adjust for this

3.7 Journeys originating in Scotland, and cross-border journeys: the statistics are compiled on the basis of where each journey starts. For example, someone who used a Zonecard to travel from a suburban station to, say, Glasgow Central, and then bought a single to (say) Manchester, would be counted as making one internal (within Scotland) journey and one cross-border originating in Scotland journey.

3.8 Ticket types: the following are identified:

Full fare - e.g. first class, standard single and standard open return;

Reduced fare - e.g. saver, supersaver, cheap day return, special promotional fares, such as two for the price of one and combined rail plus add-on tickets (see below);

Season tickets - includes Zonecards

3.9 Journeys datasets in LENNON - LENNON contains two datasets - pre-allocation (sales) and post-allocation (earnings). Allocations are created for each ticket group, dependant on sales levels, by ORCATS (Operational Research Computer Allocation of Tickets to Services). These allocations are principally used to apportion journeys between TOCs. ORCATS is a mathematical model, which was introduced in the 1980s, which uses a similar logic to journey planning systems and identifies passenger 'opportunities to travel' from an origin station to a destination station using timetable information. An opportunity to travel may include one or more changes of train and one journey will be generated for each train used during an opportunity to travel. This will result in the number of journeys being inflated by around 5%, compared to the pre-allocation dataset which does not assign journeys between TOCs.

3.10 Revenue: this includes all ticket revenue and miscellaneous charges associated with passenger travel, such as car park charges earned by the Train Operators. In the case of combined rail plus add-on tickets (e.g. a ticket which covers both a journey by rail and admission to an attraction, or a ticket which covers both a journey by rail and a bus, taxi or ferry journey from the destination station), the figures held in the database for revenue from the sales of such tickets do not indicate how much relates to the rail travel. Therefore, all the revenue from the sales of such tickets is counted in these statistics.

3.11 Concessionary fares: the figures for revenue include payments made by passengers for concessionary fares, but not the additional payments made by local authorities and the Strathclyde Partnership for Transport to reimburse the train operator for the difference between the concessionary fare and the normal fare for the journey (because these are not recorded in the database).

3.12 Passenger journeys by local authority: Table 7.6a and Table 7.6b are taken from the ORR National Rail Statistics Regional Usage Chapter. Table 7.6c is calculated on a similar basis and replaces versions of the table included in earlier versions of STS as the new methodology corrects the allocation of multi-trip tickets between Edinburgh and Glasgow.

3.13 Passenger journeys, using national rail tickets, to and from particular stations: the figures in Tables 7.7 and 7.8 are produced from information about through tickets sold for journeys between different destinations, and are subject to the same points as were made in the earlier paragraph on passenger journeys made using national rail tickets. However, there are differences, because the figures in these tables aim to represent the numbers of people using each individual station (but not counting those who change trains there, unless they buy another ticket: these figures are of entries and exits to/from the national rail system, not counting interchanges). Normally, a single journey between two stations within Scotland will be counted twice (once against the origin station and once against the destination station) and a single journey between Scotland and England will be counted only once (against only the station in Scotland). However, when the contractor working for the Office of Rail Regulation (ORR) produced the figures, there were two complications, the second of which caused some journeys to be counted less than this:

  • in the case of some places with more than one station, it is possible to buy a ticket which allows travel to and from any of the stations at that place. Such tickets are recorded in the database as being to/from a group station (e.g. Glasgow stations) rather than being to/from any particular station (e.g. Central or Queen Street). When the ORR's contractor produced statistics of the numbers of passengers using each station (like those in Table 7.7), it split the numbers of journeys made using tickets which specified origins/destinations as places (e.g. Glasgow) between the relevant stations. This could be based on information about services and passenger numbers for the places concerned, or could simply count them all against the major stations within the group
  • it is possible to purchase national rail tickets for travel between a particular station (or place) and an SPT zone in Glasgow - the ticket allows the traveller to use any of the stations in that SPT zone. Such tickets are recorded in the database as being between the specified place and the SPT zone. Prior to 2008 - 09 , when producing the station usage statistics, the ORR's contractor counted journeys against origins/destinations outwith Glasgow as described above. They were unable to count any origins/destinations recorded as SPT zones to specific Glasgow stations as it had no basis on which to split the journeys made using such tickets between the stations in the zones. This resulted in an underestimation of the number of passengers using Glasgow stations (in addition to the exclusions, mentioned earlier, such as journeys made using SPT zonecards.

However, from 2008-09, ORR's contractor has assigned the previously unknown origin/destinations. Information provided by the PTEs has been used to estimate the number of journeys made on national rail services on PTE sold tickets that are not captured in the rail industry's LENNON system.

Station usage figures were produced on this basis for every station in Great Britain, and made available on the ORR Web site, as described in section 5. The ORR station usage data consist of separate estimates of the total numbers of people entering, exiting and interchanging at stations. The station usage information from which Table 7.7 was produced is based on ticket sales covering all National Rail stations throughout England, Scotland and Wales. (It does not include those stations that are owned by London Underground. The ticketing system does not record certain journeys made using TfL bought travelcards, TfL Freedom Passes, staff travel passes and certain other PTE specific products. However, from 2008 - 09 the data now includes estimates of journeys and revenue made on zonal products sold outside of the main ticketing database.

The calculation of station usage levels uses sales recorded in the railway ticketing system prior to their allocation to individual operators, and so does not take into account any changes of train during the course of a journey. The figures which appear in Table 7.7 are estimates of the numbers of entries and exits, and do not include the estimated numbers of people who change trains at the specified stations (unless they buy another ticket there).

Rail punctuality - Public Performance Measure

3.14 The Public Performance Measure (PPM) combines punctuality and reliability into a single measure of the performance of individual trains against the planned timetable for the day, which may differ from the published timetable (e.g. due to engineering works, speed restrictions, flooding, etc).

3.15 For long-distance operators (such as GNER, Virgin CrossCountry and Virgin West Coast) the PPM is the percentage of trains arriving within ten minutes of timetable at the final destination; for regional operators (such as ScotRail) the PPM is the percentage arriving within five minutes of timetable. (The definitions differ because, in general, long-distance operators' trains run further than regional operators' trains.) The figures relate to all the services which are provided by the operator, so (for example) the PPM for GNER is an overall measure for all its trains, not just for those which run to, from or within Scotland.

3.16 Trains which complete their journey are measured for punctuality at the final destination. When a train fails to run its entire planned route, calling at all timetabled stations, it is either shown as cancelled (if it runs less than half of its planned mileage) or counted in the 20 or more minutes late band. Therefore, such a train would not be counted as arriving at the final destination within the number of minutes specified in the PPM.

Passengers in excess of capacity

3.17 From 2001 to 2003, the former Strategic Rail Authority monitored overcrowding on Edinburgh commuter services across the Forth Bridge . Passengers in excess of capacity (PIXC) was calculated for weekday commuter trains which arrived in Edinburgh between 07:00 and 09:59, or which departed between 16:00 and 18:59.

3.18 PIXC was calculated as the number of passengers travelling in excess of capacity on all of the specified services divided by the total number of passengers travelling on those services, and expressed as a percentage. For journeys of more than 20 minutes, capacity was deemed to be the number of standard class seats on the train; for journeys of 20 minutes or less, there was also an allowance for standing room (which varies with the type of rolling stock - e.g. for modern sliding door stock, it was typically of the order of 35% of the number of seats).

3.19 The SRA set limits on the level of PIXC at 4.5% on one peak, and 3.0% across both peaks. However, there is no requirement to monitor passengers in excess of capacity under the current Scottish passenger rail franchise, which applies from 17 October 2004 (the date when First Group took over the operation of the ScotRail franchise) - and therefore such information is no longer collected.

Rail passenger satisfaction: National Passenger Survey

3.20 Passengers' ratings of their train journeys are shown in three groups: those which are regarded as generic; those which relate to the station; and those which relate to the journey.

3.21 The table shows the percentages who said that they were satisfied / very satisfied with each factor, or who rated it as good / very good. The difference between the percentage shown for a factor and 100% is made up of both

(a) those who said that they were dissatisfied / very dissatisfied, or who rated it poor / very poor; and

(b) those who said that they were neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, or who rated it neither good / very good nor poor / very poor.

3.22 A passenger who changes trains later in the course of a journey is asked for his/her views of the first station and the first train that was used of the journey after they were given a questionnaire. In all analyses, such a person's answers are counted against the operator of the first train.

3.23 ScotRail is classified as a regional operator by the Office of Rail Regulation, therefore results for ScotRail should be compared with those for all GB regional operators that appear in the table. 'Others whose journey started in Scotland' is made up of long distance routes and these results should be compared with all GB long distance operators.

Freight traffic

3.24 Freight traffic: the figures for 1996-97 onwards were prepared from information supplied by the rail freight companies. The numbers of tonne-kilometres in those years relate to the whole distance that the freight is carried on the companies' trains, not just to that part of the journey which is within Scotland.

3.25 Origins and destinations of freight traffic: three points should be noted about the figures which have been provided by the rail companies for 1996-97 onwards:

(i) lifted within Scotland includes freight from abroad which arrives at a Scottish port (eg Hunterston) and is lifted from there by rail;

(ii) lifted outwith UK includes freight from abroad which was imported via ports in England and Wales (eg Teesside) and was then brought from there into Scotland by rail;

(iii) lifted within Scotland, delivered outwith UK includes freight which is delivered to a Scottish port (eg Leith) or to an English port (eg Southampton) for export

It follows that the figures in the tables for freight lifted or delivered outwith the UK cover much more than just rail traffic which goes through the Channel Tunnel.

There are no statistics available for freight lifted or delivered outwith UK in the years prior to 1996-97. In the figures that were produced for those years, traffic delivered by rail to ports for export was counted on the basis of the location of the port, and so was counted under either Scotland or elsewhere in the UK. Similarly, freight which was imported, and picked up by rail at a port, was counted on the basis of the location of the port. However, the figures that were produced for those years excluded any international freight traffic through the Channel Tunnel (for which freight services commenced in June 1994).

Other statistics

3.26 Railway Accidents: the statistics are of railway incidents statutorily reported under The Reporting of Incidents, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR). These regulations came into force on the 1 April 1996 and brought railway accident reporting in line with other industry accident reporting. The fatalities are classified by the former Region because those are the areas which are shown in the Rail Atlas which HM Railway Inspectorate uses to identify the locations of the fatalities. Due to an EU safety directive which came into force in 2006, railway accident statistics in table 7.19 and 7.20 have been changed from a financial year basis to a calendar year basis with effect from 2003.

4. Sources

4.1 Tables 7.1, 7.2, 7.3 (ScotRail figures) and 7.4 to 7.8 were supplied by the Office of Rail Regulation, which produced the numbers of passenger journeys, and the associated revenue, from information held in the LENNON database. This records the number of tickets, and the associated revenue, for journeys between every pair of railway stations in Great Britain, and other information, such as estimates (which are sent to it by ScotRail) of the numbers of rail journeys which were made by holders of SPT's multi-modal Zonecard - for further details, please see the notes and definitions in Section 3. As indicated earlier, the ORR provided revised figures for 2003-04 and earlier years for Tables 7.1, 7.2 and H1. Some of the other tables include figures for 2003-04 and earlier years which appeared in previous editions, having been supplied by the former Strategic Rail Authority, which derived them in a similar way. Table 7.6 in the 2012 publication is taken from the ORR National Rail Statistics, regional usage chapter. Note that the table showing travel between Local Authorities included in previous versions of STS has not been included in this publication as the methodology used to allocate journeys is being investigated. An updated version of the table will be included on the website in due course.

4.2 The SPT figures in Table 7.17, were compiled from information provided by the Strathclyde Partnership for Transport.

4.3 The rail punctuality (Public Performance Measure) figures in Table 7.9 and 7.10 were provided by the ORR. The punctuality of trains is generally recorded using automated monitoring systems, which log performance using the signalling equipment.

4.4 The rail passenger satisfaction survey figures in Table 7.11 were provided by Passenger Focus. The survey is conducted by distributing self-completion questionnaires, with reply-paid envelopes, to about 700 stations across GB, which are selected to be representative of the entire network, including about 50 stations in Scotland. A few shifts are also conducted on train. The questionnaires are distributed at different times of the day and across different days of the week. There are two survey periods per year: Spring and Autumn. The overall response rate is about 33%. The data are weighted to represent the passengers using each operator's services. Data is weighted by journey purpose, station size and by weekend/weekday. Passenger Focus publishes the results of the Spring and Autumn surveys separately, but has combined them for publication here, in order to provide annual figures.

4.5 Tables 7.12 and 7.13: the figures for 1996-97 and later years were prepared from information supplied by the rail freight companies.

4.6 Tables 7.14, 7.15 and 7.16 were compiled from information supplied by Network Rail.

4.7 Table 7.18 and 7.19 were supplied by the Office of Rail Regulation.

5. Further Information

5.1 Rail statistics for Great Britain are available from the annual DfT publication Transport Statistics Great Britain and from the Office of Rail Regulation's quarterly National Rail Trends. The fourth quarter edition of National Rail Trends also includes figures for individual Train Operating Companies and for Scotland, Wales and the regions of England. Figures for the 100 busiest stations are available on the ORR Web site www.rail-reg.gov.uk - tel: 020 7282 2192/2196 or rstats@orr.gsi.gov.uk. .

5.2 Passenger satisfaction figures from the National Passenger Survey - contact David Greeno of Passenger Focus (tel: 0300 123 0837).

5.3 Services supported and/or operated by Strathclyde Partnership for Transport (including Glasgow Subway) - Allen Doyle of SPT(tel: 0141 333 3774).

5.4 Railway accidents - Peter Moran, Office of Rail Regulation (tel: 0207 282 2074) email rstats@orr.gov.uk .

5.5 Network Rail statistics - contact David Boyce (tel: 0141 555 4107).

6. Other data sources

Within Scottish Transport Statistics:

Chapter 11 - Personal Travel chapter (including travel to work)

Other Transport Scotland Publications:

Transport and Travel in Scotland - includes more detailed analysis of SHS data, in particular:

Table 28 - Frequency of bus and train use

Tables 29 and 30 - Views on local buses and trains

Scottish Household Survey Travel Diary - includes detailed tables using the Travel Diary dataset, in particular:

Table 2 - journeys by mode of transport

Table 2a - journey distance by mode of transport

Table 4a - mode of transport by journey distance

Table 5a - distance summary statistics by mode of transport

SHS Local Authority Results - provides breakdowns of SHS data by Local Authority, Regional Transport Partnership and Urban Rural Classification. In particular:

Table 16 - Proportion of journeys by mode of transport

Department for Transport publish the results of the National Rail Travel Survey which covers passenger journeys in Great Britain.

Office of Rail Regulation publish a range of statistics for GB including National Rail Trends, which includes a section on regional usage providing data at Scotland level (some of which is replicated in this chapter). There is also a Data Portal available through the ORR website.

Non Official Statistics sources include rail service providers.

Figure 7.1 Passenger traffic originating in Scotland, and ScotRail passenger

Figure 7.1 Passenger traffic originating in Scotland, and ScotRail passenger

Figure 7.2 Freight traffic lifted in Scotland

Figure 7.2 Freight traffic lifted in Scotland

Table 7.1 ScotRail passenger services
2002-032 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
million
Passenger journeys1 63.16 60.75 57.38 57.45 64.02 69.43 71.59 74.47 76.43 76.93 78.29 81.10 83.25
Passenger kilometres 1,939 1,969 1,944  2,020  2,162  2,283  2,338  2,426  2,516 2,533 2,642 2,682 2,713
Scheduled train kilometres3  36.40 37.76 37.12 37.11 36.90 37.64 38.55 38.70 39.17 40.70 41.87 43.80 44.40
Route kilometres operated 3,016 3,016 3,025 3,025 3,025 3,032 3,032 3,032 3,042 3,043 3,066 3,066 3,066

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.  ScotRail introduced a new methodology which better estimates Strathclyde Zonecard journeys from 2009/10. Figures from 2003/04 onwards present the impact of this on previously  reported data to provide a more meaningful year on year comparison.Note that this has no impact on actual journeys undertaken. Passenger kms have also been adjusted to reflect this.

2.  Figures affected by industrial action.

3.  Scheduled train kilometres are calculated by the Office of Rail Regulation using the published winter and summer timetables. They do not take account of subsequent changes (e.g. cancellations and emergency timetables etc). 

Table 7.2   Passenger traffic originating in Scotland: journeys and revenue1,2
Type of ticket 1995-96 1996-97 1997-98 1998-99 1999-00 2000-01 2001-023 2002-033 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Passenger journeys  million
Internal (journeys wholly within Scotland)
Full fare 17.6 17.3 18.1 18.0 18.1 18.3 17.8 17.2 18.4 19.7 21.1 22.3 23.8 24.1 24.0 24.7 25.5
Reduced fare 13.0 13.9 15.0 15.8 17.1 16.9 16.5 17.2 18.0 20.6 22.4 22.7 23.5 24.7 25.8 26.8 28.8
Season ticket 23.8 24.1 25.3 26.1 26.9 27.1 16.0 15.6 17.0 18.5 20.6 22.0 22.5 24.4 23.3 24.2 25.3
Total 54.4 55.2 58.4 59.9 62.1 62.3 50.4 49.9 53.4 58.8 64.1 67.0 69.8 73.2 73.2 75.8 79.5
Cross-border originating in Scotland
Full fare 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Reduced fare 2.1 2.0 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.2 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.6
Season ticket 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total 2.3 2.3 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.5 2.6 2.4 2.5 2.5 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.7 3.8
Total passenger traffic originating in Scotland
Full fare 17.8 17.5 18.3 18.3 18.4 18.6 18.1 17.4 18.7 20.0 21.4 22.6 24.1 24.3 24.2 24.9 25.7
Reduced fare 15.1 15.9 17.1 18.1 19.5 19.1 18.9 19.4 20.2 22.7 24.7 25.1 26.1 27.6 29.0 30.3 32.3
Season ticket 23.8 24.1 25.3 26.1 27.0 27.1 16.0 15.6 17.0 18.5 20.6 22.0 22.5 24.4 23.3 24.3 25.3
Total5 56.7 57.5 60.7 62.5 64.9 64.8 53.0 52.4 55.9 61.3 66.7 69.8 72.7 76.3 76.5 79.4 83.3
Passenger revenue £ million
Internal journeys  92.7 96.9 105.8 111.9 119.9 123.8 127.8 131.4 143.9 161.7 164.9 171.0 210.1 213.1 230.4 236.0 257.6
Cross-border journeys 50.7 50.8 55.4 60.6 63.8 59.4 64.5 60.5 63.8 64.9 68.9 77.5 84.9 94.8 106.1 128.8 135.8
Total 143.4 147.7 161.2 172.5 183.7 183.3 192.3 191.8 207.7 226.6 233.8 248.4 295.0 307.9 336.5 364.9 393.4
Total at constant prices4 226.2 227.5 240.8 249.1 261.2 253.1 261.0 256.0 269.5 285.5 286.4 295.0 335.8 337.1 370.4 383.8 393.4

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1. There is a series break between 2007-08 and 2008-09 due to a change in the methodology. From 2008-09 estimates of PTE travel (zone cards) are included.

2.  Figures are lower than those for First ScotRail passenger journeys as changes of train are not taken into account in this series.

3.  Figures affected by industrial action.

4.  Adjusted approximately for general inflation using the Retail Prices index for the relevant calendar year (e.g. 2001 RPI used for 2001-02). 

5.  Total passenger figures have not been adjusted to reflect ScotRail's revised methdology and therefore are not comparable with ScotRail passenger figures.

Table 7.3 Cross-border passenger traffic originating outwith Scotland: journeys and revenue1 
Type of ticket 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Passenger journeys  million
Full fare 0.3 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2
Reduced fare 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.5 3.6
Season ticket 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total 2.6 2.4 2.5 2.4 2.6 2.8 2.9 3.1 3.3 3.7 3.8
Passenger revenue £ million
Total 63.9 60.1 63.6 64.5 68.9 77.5 85.7 94.8 106.1 128.8 135.8
Total at constant prices2 86.8 80.2 82.5 81.3 84.4 92.0 97.6 103.8 116.8 135.5 135.8

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.   The Office of Rail Regulation has revised the series of figures for cross-border passenger journeys originating outwith Scotland (back to 1990-91) 

2.  Adjusted approximately for general inflation using the Retail Prices index for the relevant calendar year (e.g. 2001 RPI used for 2001-02). 

Table 7.4 Passenger journeys using national rail tickets1 to, from or within Scotland, 2011-12
Passenger journeys made using national rail tickets Change since                                       1995-96
thousands percentage percentage
All such passenger journeys to, from or within Scotland2 87,096 100.0% 77.9%
of which:
within Scotland2 79,515 91.3% 79.2%
to / from England and Wales 7,580 8.7% 65.9%
of which:
to / from  London 2,046 2.3% 66.1%
to / from  North West England 1,941 2.2% 132.1%
to / from  North East England 1,576 1.8% 117.1%
to / from  Yorkshire and the Humber 893 1.0% 66.5%
to / from West Midlands 279 0.3% 24.1%
to / from East England 277 0.3% -1.9%
to / from South East 241 0.3% -25.1%
to / from East Midlands 191 0.2% 30.1%
to / from South West 90 0.1% -51.6%
to / from Wales 48 0.1% -36.4%

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.   Through journeys made using tickets whose sales were recorded directly by the rail industry's central ticketing system. 

2.  Total passenger figures have not been adjusted to reflect ScotRail's revised methdology and are therefore not comparable with ScotRail passenger figures.

Table 7.5 Distances travelled by passengers1 to Aberdeen, Edinburgh and Glasgow2 2009-10
Aberdeen Edinburgh Glasgow
percentages
0 - under 5 kms 0.0 0.9 19.7
5 - under 10 kms 19.7 6.8 29.0
10 - under 20 kms 1.0 6.6 24.7
20 - under 50 kms 18.8 31.2 16.6
50 - under 100 kms 10.1 37.2 5.3
100+ kms 50.5 17.3 4.7
All passenger journeys made using national rail tickets 100.0 100.0 100.0

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1. Based on ticket sales from central ticketing system (therefore excludes journeys made using zonecards) 

2.   journeys for which the destination is one of the stations in the Council area (e.g. Edinburgh includes Brunstane, Curriehill, Dalmeny, etc)

Table 7.6a Cross border rail passenger journeys starting or ending in Scotland1
Journeys (thousands) by District/Unitary Authority
To/From 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 % change 2011-12 on 2010-11
Aberdeen City 245 252 239 256 280 279 289 301 355 338 -4.7
Aberdeenshire 14 15 14 15 15 16 19 22 27 25 -7.1
Angus 41 39 39 38 38 42 43 44 50 46 -7.8
Argyll And Bute 19 22 22 22 29 31 29 32 33 33 0.0
Clackmannan - - - - - - 3 3 4 4 18.9
Dumfries And Galloway 280 296 321 341 330 339 337 347 372 392 5.6
Dundee City 151 150 146 145 148 158 163 170 194 192 -0.6
East Ayrshire 22 22 22 22 21 20 20 22 28 28 2.4
East Dunbartonshire 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 7 9 11 18.6
East Lothian 31 33 33 33 37 44 48 47 53 56 5.1
East Renfrewshire 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 4 5 5 6.2
Edinburgh, City Of 2,152 2,252 2,193 2,394 2,555 2,689 2,873 3,116 3,377 3,494 3.5
Falkirk 23 25 25 25 50 53 57 58 66 69 4.3
Fife 196 199 208 208 217 229 240 246 287 287 0.0
Glasgow City 61 65 59 52 1,288 1,336 1,421 1,624 1,873 1,928 2.9
Highland 145 143 136 143 139 147 146 148 166 151 -9.3
Inverclyde 19 21 21 21 21 20 19 20 24 22 -7.6
Moray 25 25 23 22 21 19 21 20 25 22 -10.4
North Ayrshire 24 25 26 25 26 25 26 29 34 32 -4.4
North Lanarkshire 93 93 87 89 95 96 101 96 107 106 -1.8
Perth And Kinross 57 60 59 59 63 67 72 79 87 86 -2.0
Renfrewshire 14 16 16 16 16 16 17 19 23 22 -4.4
South Ayrshire 33 32 35 35 36 35 34 37 41 41 -0.5
South Lanarkshire 10 11 12 11 12 14 15 18 24 24 1.0
Stirling 62 66 67 72 75 82 82 83 97 96 -0.6
West Dunbartonshire 5 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 9 10 7.5
West Lothian 25 26 27 30 32 35 38 40 50 59 18.2
Scotland Other1 1,110 1,115 1,044 1,129 0 0 0 0 0 0 -
Scotland Total 4,862 5,015 4,887 5,216 5,558 5,807 6,129 6,641 7,419 7,580 2.2

Source: Office of the Rail Regulator.  National Rail Statistics, Chapter 7 - Rail Useage.

1. Since 2006-07 there have been improvements in mapping tickets sold with an unknown origin or destination.  These were previously mapped to Scotland other, but due to improved methodology, these have now been mapped to other districts or unitary authorities. One impact of this is journeys have been more accurately been mapped to Glasgow city since 2006-07 so comparisons with earlier years should not be made.  For full methodology notes, please view the ORR documentation, which can be found here: http://orr.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0014/1940/regional-usage-profiles-odm-august-2013.pdf

Table 7.6b Rail passenger journeys within Scotland1,2
Start/End points (thousands) on journeys within Scotland
To/From/Within 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 % change 2011-12 on 2010-11
Aberdeen City 1,755 1,870 1,963 2,187 2,401 2,646 2,770 2,873 3,191 3,510 10.0
Aberdeenshire 520 574 620 688 740 810 859 954 1,070 1,174 9.7
Angus 563 614 710 774 778 904 828 799 826 843 2.1
Argyll And Bute 841 953 991 1,070 1,405 1,417 1,769 1,716 1,763 1,788 1.4
Clackmannan - - - - - - 333 387 391 397 1.6
Dumfries And Galloway 264 296 320 342 330 332 364 375 399 404 1.3
Dundee City 1,058 1,173 1,296 1,375 1,348 1,448 1,480 1,500 1,532 1,539 0.5
East Ayrshire 746 750 824 820 803 773 808 842 1,043 1,166 11.8
East Dunbartonshire 2,335 2,533 2,902 3,223 3,354 3,472 3,858 3,788 3,920 4,101 4.6
East Lothian 1,061 1,130 1,185 1,300 1,367 1,609 1,788 1,801 1,781 1,884 5.8
East Renfrewshire 2,334 2,410 2,461 2,637 2,762 2,780 3,082 3,009 3,119 3,298 5.8
Edinburgh, City Of 12,259 13,204 14,945 15,426 15,899 16,723 18,195 19,781 20,291 18,526 -8.7
Falkirk 1,437 1,591 1,902 2,022 2,694 2,814 2,833 2,856 2,922 2,965 1.5
Fife 3,578 3,820 4,494 4,639 4,862 5,027 5,044 4,902 4,899 5,044 3.0
Glasgow City 16,054 19,154 21,021 23,574 49,819 51,843 58,953 61,182 63,527 64,204 1.1
Highland 1,219 1,371 1,391 1,468 1,558 1,672 1,815 1,918 2,009 2,164 7.7
Inverclyde 1,871 1,992 2,141 2,308 2,322 2,371 2,710 2,669 2,728 2,753 0.9
Moray 301 332 364 393 384 396 417 433 474 493 4.1
North Ayrshire 2,902 2,910 3,106 3,353 3,462 3,436 3,795 3,758 3,884 3,924 1.0
North Lanarkshire 4,794 5,210 5,759 6,423 6,833 6,965 7,724 7,598 7,910 8,528 7.8
Perth And Kinross 617 686 732 793 788 852 927 978 1,019 1,054 3.5
Renfrewshire 4,215 4,432 4,726 5,190 5,405 5,500 6,115 5,982 6,153 6,144 -0.2
South Ayrshire 2,144 2,149 2,364 2,554 2,651 3,081 3,340 3,162 3,214 3,153 -1.9
South Lanarkshire 4,084 4,444 5,025 5,835 6,419 6,799 7,583 7,556 7,973 8,508 6.7
Stirling 1,833 1,974 2,185 2,469 2,521 2,701 2,809 2,823 2,921 2,928 0.2
West Dunbartonshire 3,592 3,692 3,838 4,367 4,309 4,392 4,825 4,666 4,751 4,775 0.5
West Lothian 2,555 2,700 2,916 2,999 3,029 3,060 3,066 2,981 3,214 3,760 17.0
Scotland Other2 24,946 24,796 27,423 29,999 5,755 5,833 0 0 0 0 -
Scotland Total 99,876 106,759 117,605 128,229 133,996 139,656 148,091 151,288 156,924 159,031 1.3

Source: Office of the Rail Regulator.  National Rail Statistics, Chapter 7 - Rail Useage.

1. Note that this table shows start and end points of journeys so a journey starting in Aberdeen City and ending in Aberdeenshire would count once against each Local Authority.  A journey starting and ending in Angus would count twice against the Local Authority. Therefore dividing the figures in the table by two gives the number of journeys either starting or ending in a Local Authority and will match totals published elsewhere in this chapter.

2. Since 2006-07 there have been improvements in mapping tickets sold with an unknown origin or destination.  These were previously mapped to Scotland other, but due to improved methodology, these have now been mapped to other districts or unitary authorities. One impact of this is journeys have been more accurately been mapped to Glasgow city since 2006-07 so comparisons with earlier years should not be made.  For full methodology notes, please view the ORR documentation, which can be found here: http://www.rail-reg.gov.uk/upload/pdf/odm-summary-1011.pdf

Table 7.6c Rail passenger journeys wholly within Scotland, using national rail tickets1, by local authority areas2, 3 of origin and destination, 2011-124 
Destination
Origin Aberdeen City  Aberdeen-shire     Angus Argyll & Bute Clackmannanshire Dumfries & Galloway Dundee City East Ayrshire East Dunbarton-shire East Lothian East Renfrew-shire Edinburgh, City of   Falkirk Fife
thousands
Aberdeen City  418 459 116 1 0 1 77 1 2 2 0 200 7 39
Aberdeenshire 459 24 13 0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 26 0 5
Angus 116 13 39 0 0 0 159 0 0 0 0 32 1 10
Argyll & Bute 1 0 0 125 0 0 1 1 5 0 1 20 1 1
Clackmannanshire 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 22 7 0
Dumfries & Galloway  1 0 0 0 0 60 1 10 0 0 1 38 0 1
Dundee City 77 15 159 1 1 1 2 0 1 2 0 168 5 96
East Ayrshire 1 0 0 1 0 10 0 93 2 0 18 9 1 0
East Dunbartonshire  2 0 0 5 2 0 1 2 62 1 5 70 7 1
East Lothian 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 30 0 842 5 11
East Renfrewshire 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 18 5 0 243 19 1 0
Edinburgh, City of  200 26 32 20 22 38 168 9 70 842 19 1,096 613 1,753
Falkirk 7 0 1 1 7 0 5 1 7 5 1 613 58 6
Fife 39 5 10 1 0 1 96 0 1 11 0 1,753 6 482
Glasgow, City of  171 15 18 546 76 70 82 401 1,714 28 1,253 1,862 532 60
Highland 105 12 2 5 0 1 9 0 2 1 0 102 3 9
Inverclyde 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 2 5 0 5 14 2 1
Moray 102 9 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 13 0 2
North Ayrshire 3 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 5 0 5 25 2 1
North Lanarkshire 3 0 0 9 1 1 1 3 34 2 11 343 21 4
Perth & Kinross 20 3 18 1 1 0 116 0 2 1 0 91 4 22
Renfrewshire 2 0 0 5 1 2 1 11 21 1 21 28 6 1
South Ayrshire 3 0 1 2 0 11 2 22 5 1 5 34 3 2
South Lanarkshire 1 0 0 6 1 1 1 4 30 1 50 55 3 1
Stirling 16 2 8 5 81 1 22 1 17 2 3 368 160 4
West Dunbartonshire  1 0 0 152 1 0 0 3 54 0 7 23 4 1
West Lothian 4 0 0 2 1 0 4 0 2 10 1 1,398 28 9
Scotland 1,755 587 422 894 198 202 770 583 2,051 942 1,649 9,263 1,482 2,522
Destination
Glasgow, City of  Highland Inverclyde  Moray North Ayrshire North Lanark-shire Perth & Kinross Renfrew-shire South Ayrshire South Lanark-shire Stirling West Dunbarton-shire West Lothian Scotland
thousands
Aberdeen City  171 105 1 102 3 3 20 2 3 1 16 1 4 1,755
Aberdeenshire 15 12 0 9 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 587
Angus 18 2 0 1 0 0 18 0 1 0 8 0 0 422
Argyll & Bute 546 5 3 0 2 9 1 5 2 6 5 152 2 894
Clackmannanshire 76 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 81 1 1 198
Dumfries & Galloway  70 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 11 1 1 0 0 202
Dundee City 82 9 0 3 1 1 116 1 2 1 22 0 4 770
East Ayrshire 401 0 2 0 1 3 0 11 22 4 1 3 0 583
East Dunbartonshire  1,714 2 5 0 5 34 2 21 5 30 17 54 2 2,051
East Lothian 28 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 10 942
East Renfrewshire 1,253 0 5 0 5 11 0 21 5 50 3 7 1 1,649
Edinburgh, City of  1,862 102 14 13 25 343 91 28 34 55 368 23 1,398 9,263
Falkirk 532 3 2 0 2 21 4 6 3 3 160 4 28 1,482
Fife 60 9 1 2 1 4 22 1 2 1 4 1 9 2,522
Glasgow, City of  11,968 101 733 12 1,037 3,201 140 1,909 610 3,390 452 1,405 318 32,102
Highland 101 606 1 65 1 1 35 1 2 1 14 2 2 1,082
Inverclyde 733 1 272 0 13 10 0 275 10 17 2 7 1 1,376
Moray 12 65 0 33 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 247
North Ayrshire 1,037 1 13 0 357 11 1 228 236 19 3 9 1 1,962
North Lanarkshire 3,201 1 10 0 11 312 2 42 14 148 18 40 30 4,264
Perth & Kinross 140 35 0 2 1 2 24 1 2 1 37 1 1 527
Renfrewshire 1,909 1 275 0 228 42 1 266 156 62 8 23 2 3,072
South Ayrshire 610 2 10 0 236 14 2 156 428 16 5 6 2 1,577
South Lanarkshire 3,390 1 17 0 19 148 1 62 16 389 5 46 5 4,254
Stirling 452 14 2 1 3 18 37 8 5 5 206 4 17 1,464
West Dunbartonshire  1,405 2 7 0 9 40 1 23 6 46 4 596 3 2,388
West Lothian 318 2 1 0 1 30 1 2 2 5 17 3 38 1,880
Scotland 32,102 1,082 1,376 247 1,962 4,264 527 3,072 1,577 4,254 1,464 2,388 1,880 79,515

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.   Based on ticket sales from central ticketing system (therefore excludes journeys made using zonecards) 

2.   In this table a journey between two local authorities is only counted once.

3.  The table does not show the local authority areas which do not contain any stations 

4.  Total passenger figures have not been adjusted to reflect ScotRail's revised methdology and are therefore not comparable with ScotRail passenger figures.

Note: Previous versions of this table for the years 2008-09 to 2010-11 can be found in the STS no 32 Excel datasets here  http://www.transportscotland.gov.uk/analysis/statistics/publications/scottish-transport-statistics-previous-editions

Table 7.7 Passenger journeys to and from the main stations in Scotland: 2011-121, 2, 3, 4
Rank thousands Rank thousands
1 Glasgow Central  26,639 51 Edinburgh Park  646
2 Edinburgh  22,585 52 Troon  644
3 Glasgow Queen Street  20,930 53 Coatbridge Sunnyside  643
4 Paisley Gilmour Street  3,641 54 Singer  630
5 Aberdeen  3,170 55 Dunfermline  608
6 Partick  2,494 56 Kilmarnock  588
7 Stirling  2,261 57 Blairhill  568
8 Haymarket  2,072 58 Garrowhill  553
9 Charing Cross (Glasgow)  2,047 59 Balloch  553
10 Dundee  1,723 60 Clarkston  551
11 Ayr  1,523 61 Queen's Park (Glasgow)  546
12 Hyndland  1,475 62 Greenock West  544
13 Exhibition Centre Glasgow  1,318 63 Hairmyres  542
14 Motherwell  1,301 64 Bearsden  534
15 Johnstone  1,262 65 Crossmyloof  531
16 Helensburgh Central  1,210 66 Blantyre  527
17 Argyle Street  1,196 67 Cathcart  527
18 Inverness  1,180 68 Newton  516
19 Croy  1,179 69 South Gyle  514
20 Airdrie  1,159 70 Bellgrove  504
21 Inverkeithing  1,124 71 Stonehaven  503
22 Linlithgow  1,122 72 Falkirk Grahamston  502
23 Anniesland  1,103 73 Dunblane  495
24 Mount Florida  1,062 74 Bridgeton  489
25 Kilwinning  1,012 75 High Street  484
26 Falkirk High  992 76 Leuchars  481
27 Kirkcaldy  988 77 Bishopton  479
28 East Kilbride  985 78 Largs  472
29 Perth  959 79 North Berwick  470
30 Irvine  914 80 Gourock  463
31 Milngavie  905 81 Port Glasgow  456
32 Rutherglen  894 82 Neilston  451
33 Hamilton Central  873 83 Easterhouse  447
34 Bathgate  871 84 Scotstounhill  403
35 Hamilton West  845 85 Patterton  402
36 Livingston North  826 86 Alloa  401
37 Lenzie  823 87 Arbroath  399
38 Bishopbriggs  806 88 Clydebank  396
39 Dalmuir  802 89 Greenock Central  391
40 Uddingston  770 90 Jordanhill  391
41 Cambuslang  758 91 Drumchapel  387
42 Larbert  748 92 Musselburgh  387
43 Dumbarton Central  736 93 Montrose  387
44 Westerton  735 94 Saltcoats  384
45 Polmont  688 95 Dumfries  374
46 Shettleston  683 96 Dumbarton East  362
47 Dyce  678 97 Dalmeny  356
48 Bellshill  673 98 Alexandria  348
49 Barrhead  649 99 Prestwick Internat'nl Airport 5  337
50 Anderston  647 100 Crosshill  298

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.  Figures estimate the total number of people arriving or departing from the main stations in Scotland

2. Figures have not been adjusted to reflect ScotRail's revised methdology and are therefore not comparable with ScotRail passenger figures.

3.  Stations associated with a group station can show large year-to-year variations in usage figures, which reflect changes in ticket encoding rather than actual difference in passengers' journeys. For such tickets, journeys are allocated to the main station of those in the group. 

4.  For example, a return journey from Kirkcaldy to Edinburgh would be counted twice against Kirkcaldy (since the passenger used Kirkcaldy station twice - once when departing on the outward journey and once when arriving on completion of the return journey), and twice against Edinburgh.

5.  Prestwick airport includes rail link tickets from 2007-08.

Table 7.8  Passenger journeys to or from stations1 in Scotland that have opened (or re-opened) since 1970
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
thousands
Dunrobin Castle (1985) 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.6
Alness (1973) 2.5 3.7 5.5 7.0 7.6 9.8 11.6 13.7 14.3 17.7 25.5
Duncraig (1971) 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.6 0.7
Muir of Ord (1976) 16.8 22.1 24.6 24.4 24.7 32.6 39.2 51.1 57.4 62.4 74.5
Beauly (2002) 21.3 26.0 26.6 28.4 35.9 41.9 52.4 51.1 49.8 54.5
Loch Eil Outward Bound * (1985) 1.1 0.6 0.7 0.5 0.5 0.6 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.8 0.7
Falls of Cruachan (1988) 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.2 0.3
Loch Awe (1985) 1.6 2.1 2.5 2.4 2.8 2.2 2.3 2.5 2.9 3.1 2.5
Laurenckirk (May 2009) 56.5 73.1 86.1
Dyce (1984) 285.8 239.0 239.2 269.3 334.7 401.0 453.6 488.0 515.5 542.5 677.9
Portlethen (1985) 9.6 7.1 9.5 10.7 14.9 21.1 22.1 19.9 15.2 18.3 19.1
Glenrothes with Thornton (1992) 41.4 40.3 40.1 46.9 47.6 54.5 53.7 52.2 52.6 49.6 57.5
Dunfermline Queen Margaret (2000) 126.4 131.1 158.9 195.5 206.4 211.1 202.5 214.7 205.3 195.5 210.5
Dalgety Bay (1998) 202.1 186.4 200.8 239.3 246.9 262.3 270.9 272.7 247.8 244.3 264.2
South Gyle (1985) 408.5 365.7 355.7 405.3 424.3 410.3 464.0 496.9 475.8 473.7 513.8
Musselburgh (1988) 158.3 160.8 167.5 170.9 193.4 202.9 306.2 385.3 389.2 362.9 386.7
Wallyford (1994) 82.9 90.3 103.2 110.7 126.7 135.8 159.9 209.3 227.9 220.9 240.8
Brunstane (2002) 66.6 81.7 89.8 119.9 121.8 109.5 135.1 134.3 128.2 132.8
Newcraighall (2002) 79.7 125.8 137.4 159.8 176.9 190.0 182.9 194.2 182.0 191.0
Edinburgh Park (2003) 68.1 295.0 353.3 367.6 382.6 434.2 451.8 499.4 646.0
Uphall (1986) 209.1 214.9 225.6 227.7 248.7 250.7 255.2 254.1 226.7 220.9 325.1
Livingston North (1986) 516.7 542.8 567.8 584.2 621.6 624.2 602.4 566.0 552.7 631.0 825.5
Bathgate (1986) 581.1 599.1 585.3 627.1 645.4 650.6 650.0 645.8 607.3 694.9 871.0
Kingsknowe (1971) 19.0 14.1 15.8 18.4 18.5 19.9 19.3 20.3 19.7 15.8 17.5
Wester Hailes (1987) 17.5 15.1 17.5 19.3 20.9 18.9 18.9 20.4 22.7 23.1 29.8
Curriehill (1987) 30.8 28.3 38.2 40.1 43.6 41.0 43.3 47.1 46.9 48.5 52.9
Livingston South (1984) 167.8 163.8 191.5 217.9 227.4 225.6 231.4 245.6 250.2 295.8 285.4
Bridge of Allan (1985) 115.1 106.7 120.5 130.9 167.1 191.8 224.1 224.6 235.2 227.3 243.5
Camelon (1994) 61.5 61.0 73.0 83.0 90.0 90.5 96.6 97.3 92.1 97.7 104.5
Alloa (May 2008) 336.0 390.0 390.7 401.1
Stepps (1989) 128.6 127.8 169.2 202.3 228.2 263.4 277.3 343.0 301.2 291.0 302.2
Gartcosh (2005) 99.6 111.0 124.3 131.7 134.3 143.8
Greenfaulds (1989) 50.4 43.2 62.3 72.8 83.0 93.7 107.0 121.4 131.3 136.1 132.6
Drumgelloch (1989) 133.9 112.9 103.9 130.9 172.9 165.2 168.4 193.0 170.9 58.5 269.2
Ashfield (1993) 39.8 29.5 33.3 39.9 38.7 42.5 43.8 57.9 58.0 54.7 69.7
Possilpark & Parkhouse (1993) 32.3 21.2 25.7 32.8 38.2 60.2 79.2 106.7 93.8 90.3 112.0
Gilshochill *  (1993) 26.9 20.4 24.0 27.9 33.1 74.0 82.4 103.0 96.0 84.8 89.5
Summerston (1993) 47.5 34.1 49.4 59.4 68.5 83.5 90.5 118.2 119.7 116.5 140.5
Maryhill (1993) 38.4 26.6 37.4 45.3 49.3 53.3 55.6 77.4 69.1 65.3 80.3
Kelvindale (2005) 17.4 95.0 107.7 109.5 109.7 90.4 94.4
Exhibition Centre * (1979) 373.0 371.8 396.2 499.2 632.9 762.8 866.5 1153.1 1054.2 1170.0 1317.8
Anderston (1979) 184.7 163.9 192.3 240.5 340.7 381.9 428.6 651.3 551.9 576.8 647.2
Argyle Street (1979) 414.3 363.2 409.2 467.3 574.3 616.7 606.4 911.8 734.8 783.6 1196.5
Bridgeton * (1979) 171.4 139.6 173.2 206.7 240.0 286.2 308.7 466.9 394.0 409.1 489.3
Dalmarnock (1979) 54.5 42.2 45.2 48.6 58.1 61.1 61.2 79.8 77.3 76.8 79.6
Carmyle (1993) 58.2 56.6 64.5 80.0 100.0 102.2 106.2 131.6 124.3 127.0 135.3
Mount Vernon (1993) 26.0 22.9 28.9 30.5 34.9 36.8 41.1 58.2 51.4 55.7 56.7

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.  Figures have not been adjusted to reflect ScotRail's revised methdology and are therefore not comparable with ScotRail passenger figures.

*   This is the current name - the station had a different name when it was opened (or re-opened) 

Table 7.8  Passenger journeys to or from stations1 in Scotland that have opened (or re-opened) since 1970
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
thousands
Baillieston (1993) 44.9 38.8 44.4 48.1 50.3 57.4 66.4 90.8 89.1 97.0 109.2
Bargeddie (1993) 36.8 37.0 47.9 58.7 66.8 74.4 78.1 97.4 85.8 89.8 99.4
Kirkwood (1993) 99.2 87.5 92.8 107.4 114.3 114.8 120.8 158.9 140.6 138.9 150.0
Whifflet (1992) 168.0 161.1 176.8 186.2 203.8 219.0 229.6 282.3 246.6 246.7 254.5
Airbles (1989) 38.0 41.2 51.2 62.0 78.6 89.2 94.2 114.9 104.5 107.8 110.1
Shieldmuir (1990) 10.9 8.5 7.4 6.6 8.2 10.6 23.0 44.8 48.9 57.3 56.8
0.0
Charterherault (2005) 3.5 17.3 23.5 41.0 49.8 57.1 59.5
Merryton (2005) 20.0 81.1 97.6 99.5 104.0 102.6 106.3
Larkhall (2005) 83.2 268.7 307.9 334.4 323.1 316.8 327.1
IBM (1978) 105.9 94.5 104.9 128.8 117.3 94.0 93.5 205.7 145.7 136.4 127.8
Drumfrochar (1998) 38.5 38.9 40.5 42.3 49.0 45.7 43.3 58.5 59.1 61.3 55.2
Whinhill (1990) 26.3 29.7 31.0 33.5 36.7 32.8 32.2 37.9 35.2 37.7 40.0
Drumbreck (1990) 67.3 59.3 71.7 89.1 97.3 97.6 92.5 124.0 111.5 109.5 114.1
Corkerhill (1990) 116.6 96.3 106.6 126.2 147.2 153.1 154.7 212.8 192.4 211.9 236.6
Mosspark (1990) 58.2 55.4 65.9 79.3 91.9 93.1 100.3 125.7 111.0 111.2 117.4
Crookston (1990) 57.7 59.7 68.5 81.2 99.8 113.2 114.7 132.6 115.1 120.0 126.4
Hawkhead (1991) 60.3 61.1 71.3 80.9 100.5 109.5 117.0 157.1 137.7 139.5 145.5
Paisley Canal (1990) 132.2 127.5 137.5 158.3 176.2 187.5 189.9 231.7 215.2 219.1 232.8
Milliken Park (1989) 77.9 75.0 82.1 92.1 110.2 118.0 124.2 154.9 137.4 142.3 151.2
Howwood (2001) 21.3 23.9 26.8 29.4 32.7 50.3 48.3 42.9 41.5 41.3 47.9
Ardrossan Town (1987) 7.9 7.1 9.3 13.5 16.5 16.5 15.2 22.9 18.6 18.7 20.6
Prestwick Airport (1994) 70.1 69.1 79.1 87.3 95.3 113.7 569.7 2 766.8 532.3 315.3 337.0
Priesthill & Darnley (1990) 20.3 17.2 22.1 27.5 51.4 69.9 78.6 94.5 86.0 105.1 115.9
Kilmaurs (1984) 65.5 68.0 65.5 68.3 69.4 72.5 73.4 84.4 81.0 95.5 102.1
Auchinleck (1984) 29.5 28.9 31.0 35.9 37.8 39.0 35.7 38.5 37.8 43.3 55.7
New Cumnock (1991) 14.9 15.8 17.1 21.3 23.1 21.8 19.9 23.0 22.1 26.2 28.0
Sanquhar (1994) 20.8 22.1 21.9 24.1 25.8 25.4 23.4 24.3 23.9 22.4 28.4
Gretna Green (1993) 21.3 22.8 23.3 29.7 32.2 27.0 28.8 28.2 31.3 13.9 36.6

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.  Figures have not been adjusted to reflect ScotRail's revised methdology and are therefore not comparable with ScotRail passenger figures.

2. Prestwick airport includes rail link tickets from 2007-08.

* This is the current name - the station had a different name when it was opened (or re-opened) 

Table 7.9 Rail punctuality: Public Performance Measure - for all services  
2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
percentage of trains arriving on time
GNER1  70.8 74.1 77.5 83.5 82.7 - - - - - -
East Coast1, 3, 5 - - - - - 83.6 86.9 87.4 83.3 86.6 83.9
ScotRail2 82.1 85.5 83.1 85.8 88.8 90.6 90.6 90.7 90.1 90.7  93.0
Virgin CrossCountry1 61.7 72.2 77.8 80.9 83.9 - - - - - -
CrossCountry1, 4, - - - - - 88.2 90.1 90.1 88.2 89.6 86.8
Virgin Trains1 73.5 74.8 72.1 83.5 86.0 86.2 80.0 84.6 86.6 85.9 83.6
GB long-distance operators1 70.6 73.4 79.1 82.2 84.9 86.2 87.3 88.9 87.9 89.2 87.1
GB regional operators2 80.5 82.8 82.6 85.0 87.6 89.6 90.6 92.0 91.1 92.0 91.6

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1 For long-distance operators, the figures are the percentages of trains which arrive at the final destination within ten minutes of the timetabled time (i.e. are no more than 9 minutes and 59 seconds late)

2 For regional operators, the figures are the percentages of trains which arrive at the final destination within five minutes of the timetabled time (i.e. are no more than 4 minutes and 59 seconds late)

3 National Express East Coast has taken over the franchise previously operated by GNER.

4 CrossCountry is now operating most of the Virgin CrossCountry franchise routes and some routes from the Central Trains franchise.

5 National Express East Coast services were transferrred to East Coast on 13 November 2009

Table 7.10 ScotRail services: arrival times at final destinations1
2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
percentages
Total within 5 minutes 82.1 85.5 83.1 85.8 88.8 90.6 90.6 90.7 90.1 90.7 93.0
Total within 10 minutes 91.8 94.3 93.0 94.4 95.2 95.9 96.1 95.8 95.3 95.7 97.3
Total within 20 minutes 95.7 97.5 96.8 97.4 97.3 97.5 97.7 97.3 97.0 97.1 98.4
20 minutes and over2 2.7 1.7 2.1 1.5 1.5 1.4 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.4 1.0
Cancelled3 1.7 0.8 1.1 1.1 1.2 1.1 0.9 1.0 1.4 1.5 0.7
                  thousands
Number of trains due to be run4 599 662 667 691 693 706 697 715 715 719 726

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1 For example, Total within 5 minutes gives the percentage which were no more than 4 minutes and 59 seconds late

2 Includes part-cancelled trains (those which failed to reach their final destination but ran at least half their planned mileage)

3 Includes trains which ran less than half their planned mileage

4 As in the planned timetable for the day.  This may differ from the published timetable due to (e.g.) engineering works, floods, etc.

Table 7.11 Rail passenger satisfaction: National Passenger Survey
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
ScotRail passengers percentage who were satisfied or said good1
Overall opinion of journey 80 82 85 85 87 84 89 89 88 88 89
How deals with delays 23 32 35 40 46 33 40 41 42 34 39
Value for money 56 55 58 57 56 57 59 57 59 57 52
How station staff handle requests 79 84 87 83 83 82 88 86 81 89 90
Overall station environment 59 63 65 64 67 71 74 78 77 76 76
Ticket buying facilities 77 74 72 71 74 78 85 83 81 80 82
Info. re. times, platforms 70 72 76 78 79 78 83 85 85 85 88
Punctuality / reliability 73 75 80 79 86 83 89 88 87 84 87
Length of journey time 83 85 87 87 89 88 89 90 88 90 91
Ease of getting on/off 83 82 84 84 84 83 85 88 86 87 88
Amount of seats / standing space 70 70 72 72 71 71 72 77 75 73 78
Frequency 70 78 81 83 82 80 82 84 82 83 82
Train Cleanliness 71 75 74 77 79 79 79 81 77 80 83
Comfort of seats 74 76 76 80 80 78 76 79 76 80 81
Sample size 2,024 2,416 2,042 2,114  2,015  2,029  2,091  2,067  2,113  2,568 2,539
Others whose journeys started in Scotland2 percentage who were satisfied or said good1
Overall opinion of journey 87 87 84 80 89 87 85 90 92 91 87
How deals with delays 52 68 56 52 69 58 54 56 62 54 55
Value for money 64 66 68 64 70 70 65 65 69 62 65
How station staff handle requests 81 91 88 94 87 82 90 87 90 86 91
Overall station environment 72 75 81 78 79 79 80 83 82 78 63
Ticket buying facilities 83 87 90 85 78 82 78 90 86 89 81
Info. re. times, platforms 77 85 80 89 86 87 86 91 91 87 86
Punctuality / reliability 76 78 82 73 87 86 87 90 88 87 89
Length of journey time 82 79 81 78 86 84 82 87 88 88 87
Ease of getting on/off 78 82 76 77 78 83 81 83 85 85 86
Amount of seats / standing space 80 80 70 73 71 77 72 80 79 77 79
Frequency 81 76 72 73 83 78 72 84 82 80 79
Train Cleanliness 79 77 81 83 84 89 84 86 86 81 86
Comfort of seats 70 72 71 80 78 77 74 78 80 77 81
Sample size 464 457 382 420 480 323 391 481 562 672 706
All GB regional operators percentage who were satisfied or said good1
Overall opinion of journey 78 80 82 83 85 82 86 86 87 86 86
Punctuality / reliability 72 73 76 79 82 82 84 86 86 84 84
All GB long-distance operators
Overall opinion of journey 80 80 81 83 88 86 84 86 87 86 88
Punctuality / reliability 71 68 75 78 86 84 81 86 86 85 87

Source: Passenger Focus - Not National Statistics

1 The difference from 100 includes both those who were dis-satisfied or said poor  and (e.g.) those who were neither satisfied nor dis-satisfied.

2 Excluding passengers whose journey started on a ScotRail service, who are counted as ScotRail passengers

Table 7.12  Freight traffic lifted in Scotland by destination and by commodity 
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Freight lifted (weight)
by destination million tonnes
within Scotland 4.03 4.27 3.75 4.36 4.80 5.30 6.30 6.13 6.08 4.86 5.03
elsewhere in the UK 4.90 4.36 4.13 6.38 8.97 7.13 4.55 3.84 3.25 3.11 2.21
outwith the UK1  0.64 0.49 0.43 0.51 0.54 0.53 0.50 0.39 0.36 0.36 0.37
Total 9.57 9.12 8.32 11.25 14.31 12.96 11.35 10.36 9.69 8.33 7.61
by commodity million tonnes
minerals/ coal, coke 7.58 7.18 6.24 8.73 10.80 9.87 7.29 6.09 5.77 5.26 4.17
other 1.99 1.94 2.08 2.52 3.52 3.09 4.06 4.27 3.91 3.07 3.43
Total 9.57 9.12 8.32 11.25 14.32 12.96 11.35 10.36 9.68 8.33 7.60
Freight moved (weight x distance)
by destination million tonne-kilometres
within Scotland 572 632 576 632 623 692 1,143 1,230 1,329 1,380 1,002
elsewhere in the UK 2,083 1,752 1,634 2,734 3,296 2,530 1,388 1,047 971 848 734
outwith the UK1  444 353 308 368 385 375 352 266 249 258 265
Total 3,099 2,737 2,519 3,734 4,304 3,597 2,883 2,543 2,549 2,486 2,001
by commodity                 million tonne-kilometres
minerals/ coal, coke 2,293 2,017 1,734 2,797 3,479 2,846 1,749 1,443 1,324 1,180 1,039
other 806 720 783 939 825 751 1,134 1,100 1,225 1,305 961
Total 3,099 2,737 2,517 3,736 4,304 3,597 2,883 2,543 2,549 2,485 2,000

Source: Rail freight companies - Not National Statistics

1. From 1996-97, outwith the UK includes freight taken to ports for export (such freight was previously counted under either within Scotland or elsewhere in the UK, depending upon the location of the port).

Table 7.13  Freight traffic with a destination in Scotland by origin (where lifted) and by commodity 
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Freight lifted (weight)
by origin million tonnes
lifted within Scotland 4.03 4.27 3.75 4.36 4.80 5.30 6.30 6.13 6.08 4.86 5.03
elsewhere in the UK 1.15 1.08 1.04 0.91 2.08 2.06 2.01 2.01 1.27 1.62 1.07
outwith the UK1  0.59 0.64 0.52 0.54 0.48 0.45 0.41 0.50 0.42 0.42 0.41
Total 5.77 5.99 5.31 5.81 7.35 7.82 8.72 8.64 7.77 6.90 6.51
by commodity million tonnes
minerals/ coal, coke 4.04 4.28 3.76 4.21 4.45 5.07 4.91 4.53 3.97 3.77 3.03
other 1.73 1.71 1.55 1.61 2.91 2.74 3.80 4.10 3.80 3.12 3.49
Total 5.77 5.99 5.31 5.82 7.36 7.81 8.71 8.63 7.77 6.89 6.52
Freight moved (weight x distance)
by origin  million tonne-kilometres
lifted within Scotland 572 632 576 632 623 692 1,143 1,230 1,329 1,380 1,002
elsewhere in the UK 588 569 556 487 479 1,012 1,089 1,062 625 890 980
outwith the UK1  412 438 376 390 343 327 287 339 302 302 305
Total 1,572 1,638 1,507 1,509 1,445 2,031 2,519 2,631 2,256 2,572 2,287
by commodity million tonne-kilometres
minerals/ coal, coke 589 639 584 607 626 632 591 626 530 502 520
other 983 999 923 902 819 1,399 1,928 2,005 1,726 2,070 1,766
Total 1,572 1,638 1,507 1,509 1,445 2,031 2,519 2,631 2,256 2,572 2,286

Source: Rail freight companies - Not National Statistics

1. From 1996-97, outwith the UK includes freight imported via ports in England and Wales, which then comes by rail into Scotland (previously, such freight was counted as lifted elsewhere in the UK). It should be noted that, in all years, imported freight lifted at Scottish ports is counted under lifted in Scotland.

Table 7.14   Lines open for traffic
   2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
   kilometres
Routes
Electrified 634 634 634 634 639 639 639 639 672 676 676
Non electrified 2,095 2,095 2,095 2,095 2,097 2,097 2,097 2,106 2,087 2,087 2,087
Total 2,729 2,729 2,729 2,729 2,736 2,736 2,736 2,745 2,759 2,763 2,763

Source: Network Rail - Not National Statistics

Table 7.15  Number of stations1,2
2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Passenger and parcel 336 340 340 340 344 344 345 346 351 351 351
Freight only 116 117 118 118 118 115 118 118 118 118 119
Total 452 457 458 458 462 459 463 464 469 469 470

Source: Network Rail - Not National Statistics

1. The figures for freight stations include main yards, sidings/depots, private terminals and sidings: ballast. 

2. The figure for passenger stations for e.g. 2005-06 represents the number which were part of the national rail network at the end of the 2005-06 financial year.  All are owned by Network Rail with the exception of Prestwick Airport. 

Table 7.16 Number of passenger stations by local authority, 2011-121
Local Authority number Local Authority number Local Authority number
Aberdeen, City of 2 Edinburgh, City of 11 Orkney Islands 0
Aberdeenshire 6 Eilean Siar 0 Perth & Kinross 7
Angus 7 Falkirk 5 Renfrewshire 10
Argyll and Bute 14 Fife 19 Scottish Borders 0
Clackmannanshire 1 Glasgow, City of 61 Shetland Islands 0
Dumfries & Galloway 7 Highland 59 South Ayrshire 9
Dundee City 2 Inverclyde 14 South Lanarkshire 19
East Ayrshire 6 Midlothian 0 Stirling 6
East Dunbartonshire 6 Moray 3 West Dunbartonshire 13
East Lothian 7 North Ayrshire 12 West Lothian 12
East Renfrewshire 9 North Lanarkshire 24 Scotland 351

Source: Network Rail - Not National Statistics

1.  The number of stations open at the end of the financial year 2005-06.  All owned by Network Rail except Prestick Airport (South Ayrshire).

Table 7.17 Strathclyde Partnership for Transport - Glasgow Subway1
2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
Vehicles2 41 41 41 41 41 41 41 41 41 41 41
thousands
Loaded train kilometres 1,123 1,143 1,141 1,159 1,196 1,210 1,225 1,196 1,128 1,339 1,338
Passenger journeys 13,360 13,339 13,310 13,164 13,160 14,449 14,103 13,055 13,009 12,888 12,604
£ thousands
Revenue3  10,727 10,937 11,514 11,786 12,963 13,965 14,690 13,296 14,835 15,147 13,503
Revenue at constant prices4  14,775 14,641 14,968 14,898 15,881 16,405 16,598 15,100 16,102 15,630 13,503
Passenger receipts5  10,167 10,337 10,939 11,190 12,396 13,119 14,015 12,661 13,775 14,166 12,602
Pass. rec. at constant prices4  14,004 13,838 14,220 14,145 15,187 15,411 15,835 14,379 14,952 14,618 12,602
numbers
Operational staff 351 375 382 364 361 354 361 351 331 284 170

Source: Strathclyde Partnership for Transport - Not National Statistics

1. The Strathclyde Partnership for Transport took over the roles and functions of the Strathclyde Passenger Transport Authority and Executive from 1 April 2006.

2. Passenger carriages including power cars

3. These figures are headline revenue figures and include such as items as rental and advertising income. 

4. Adjusted approximately for general inflation using the Retail Prices Index for the relevant year (e.g. 2001 RPI used for 2001-02).

5. These figures are passenger ticket receipts as described at paragraphs 3.10 and 3.11 of the commentary. 

Table 7.18  Railway accidents
2002-03 20031 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Railway accidents
Collisions 1 2 1 0 0 2 4 1 1 2 0
Derailments 9 2 3 6 5 7 3 1 4 6 2
Running into level crossing gates
  and other obstructions2 36 23 23 27 30 32 28 44 44 31 29
Fires 28 15 16 7 8 11 4 5 5 6 4
Missiles through driver's cab 9 8 6 1 3 1 8 3 2 2 0
Miscellaneous 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All accidents 83 50 49 41 46 53 47 54 56 47 35
Casualties
Train accidents       - deaths 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0
                             - injuries 2 2 3 15 0 4 3 0 1 0 0
Accidents through movements
of railway vehicle     - deaths  0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0
                             - injuries 59 60 42 53 66 59 37 49 37 36 29
Accidents on railway
premises                -deaths 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 0
                             - injuries 250 229 240 242 171 202 163 216 170 172 125
Trespassers and suicides
(All accidents)         - deaths 15 26 18 18 27 17 20 24 20 22 33
                              - injuries 15 12 8 6 11 9 7 8 18 4 6
Total deaths 17 27 19 21 28 21 21 28 23 22 33
Total injuries 326 303 293 316 248 274 210 273 226 212 160

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1. Data from 2003 onwards based on the calendar year; previous years' figures relate to financial years (1 April to 31 March).  

2. There were also 41 incidents involving strikes with animals in 2011. 

Table 7.19  Railway fatalities by local authority1 and category, 2012
Trespasser Suicide Level  Crossing User Railway Staff Passenger Other Member of Public Total
Argyll & Bute  -  1  -  -  -  - 1
Stirlingshire  -  2  -  -  -  - 2
North Ayrshire  - 2  -  -  -  - 2
Aberdeen  -  1  -  -  -  - 1
Edinburgh, City of  -  4  -  -  -  - 4
Glasgow, City of  2  2  -  -  -  - 4
Highland  -  2  -  -  -  - 2
North Lanarkshire  2  1  -  -  -  - 3
South Lanarkshire  -  2  -  -  -  - 2
East Dunbartonshire  -  -  -  -  -  - 0
West Dunbartonshire  1  1  -  -  -  - 2
Dumfries and Galloway  1  1  -  -  -  - 2
Angus  -  1  -  -  -  - 1
East Renfrewshire  -  2  -  -  -  - 2
Fife  -  2  -  -  -  - 2
South Ayrshire  -  1  -  -  -  - 1
East Lothian  -  2  -  -  -  - 2
Scotland  6  27  -  -  -  - 33

Source: ORR - Not National Statistics

1.  The table does not show local authorities with no fatalities.

Table 7.20 Adults (16+) - views on train services of those who used them in the past month: 20121
  Agree No view Disagree Sample size (=100%)
strongly tend to All neither …nor no opinion All strongly tend to All
  row percentages
Trains run to timetable 42 50 92 3 1 4 3 1 4 2437
Train service is stable and not regularly changing 41 48 89 5 3 8 2 1 3 2437
Trains are clean 38 51 89 5 1 6 3 1 4 2437
Feel safe/secure on trains during the day 56 41 97 2 1 3 0 0 0 2437
It is simple decide what type of ticket I need 44 43 87 4 2 6 5 3 8 2437
Finding out about routes and times is easy 46 45 91 4 1 5 3 1 4 2437
Easy to change from trains to other forms of transport 36 46 82 8 6 14 4 1 5 2437
Train fares are good value 17 34 51 11 2 13 21 16 37 2437
Feel safe/secure on trains during the evening 37 40 77 8 7 15 6 2 8 2437

Source: Scottish Household Survey

1. Those who had not used a train service in the past month are not asked these questions about train services. 

Publication Date: 
Wed 26/Feb/2014
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