National Debate on Young Drivers' Safety: Final Report

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Publication Date: 
18/03/2011
Publication Summary: 
This report presents the findings of a national debate on young driver safety undertaken across Scotland. It has been undertaken to meet a commitment in Scotland’s Road Safety Framework to “conduct a public debate on young driver issues including graduate

A report by Atkins and Professor Stephen Stradling

Notice
This document and its contents have been prepared and are intended solely for Transport Scotland’s information and use in relation to the National Debate on Young Drivers’ Safety.
Atkins Limited assumes no responsibility to any other party in respect of or arising out of or in connection with this document and/or its contents.

This document is also available in pdf format (791k)

Contents

Acknowledgements
Executive Summary

1. Introduction
1.1 Background
1.2 Aims and objectives
1.3 Structure of this report

2. Context
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Key facts
2.3 Factors influencing young driver safety
2.4 Driving test statistics

3. Conducting the national debate
3.1 Overall approach
3.2 Internal brainstorm
3.3 General stakeholder engagement
3.4 Semi- structured interviews with road safety representatives
3.5 Focus groups
3.6 Online survey
3.7 Dedicated ‘Facebook’ page

4. Types of intervention considered
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Intervention Type A – Education and training for younger children and pre-drivers
4.3 Intervention Type B – Education, training and testing for learner and novice drivers
4.4 Intervention Type C – Graduated driver licensing and licence restrictions
4.5 Intervention Type D – Enforcement and restorative justice
4.6 Intervention Type E – Use of technology
4.7 Intervention Type F – Encouragement and leadership, including incentives and working with the private sector

5. Feedback from the national debate
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Intervention Type A – Education and training for younger children and pre-drivers
5.3 Intervention Type B – Education, training and testing for learner and novice drivers
5.4 Intervention Type C – Graduated driver licensing and licence restrictions
5.5 Intervention Type D - Enforcement and restorative justice
5.6 Intervention Type E – Use of technology
5.7 Intervention Type F – Encouragement and leadership, including incentives and working with the private sector
5.8 Summary of debate findings

6. Interventions for promoting young driver safety
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Detailed assessment

7. Discussion of intervention types and recommendations
7.1 Intervention Type A – Education and training for younger children and pre-drivers
7.2 Intervention Type B – Education, training and testing for learner and novice drivers
7.3 Intervention Type C – Graduated driver licensing and licence restrictions
7.4 Intervention Type D – Enforcement and restorative justice
7.5 Intervention Type E – Use of technology
7.6 Intervention Type F – Encouragement and leadership, including incentives and working with the private sector
7.7 Further overarching recommendations

Bibliography

List of Figures

Figure 2.1 – Number per thousand population killed or seriously injured while driving a car in Scotland (2005 to 2009 average)
Figure 2.2 – Number of drivers in Scotland, aged 17 to 25, killed or seriously injured by time of day, per year – 2005 to 2009 average

List of Tables

Table 2.1 – Annual car driving test statistics for Scotland (2009/10)
Table 2.2 – Age profile of those taking and passing the driving test, and average pass rate in Scotland (2009/10)
Table 5.1 – Intervention Type A - Online survey results
Table 5.2 – Intervention Type B - Online survey results
Table 5.3 – Intervention Type C - Online survey results
Table 5.4 – Intervention Type D - Online survey results
Table 5.5 – Intervention Type E - Online survey results
Table 5.6 – Comments from young people, for and against technology based interventions
Table 5.7 – Intervention Type F - Online survey results
Table 5.8 – Intervention Type F - Online survey results
Table 5.9 – Summary of preferred approaches (common themes) amongst those involved in the debate
Table 6.1 – Intervention Type A - Education and training options for younger children and pre-drivers
Table 6.2 – Intervention Type B – Education, training and testing for learner and novice drivers
Table 6.3 – Intervention Type C – Graduated driver licensing and licence restrictions
Table 6.4 – Intervention Type D – Enforcement and restorative justice
Table 6.5 – Intervention Type E – Use of technology
Table 6.6 – Intervention Type F – Encouragement and leadership, including incentives and working with the private sector
Table 7.1 – % of survey respondents who drive and are ‘unsupportive’ or ‘very unsupportive’ of restrictions on licensing

Appendix A: Case study examples
A.1 Introduction
A.2 Intervention Type A – Education and training for younger children and pre-drivers
A.3 Intervention Type B – Education, training and testing for learner and novice drivers
A.4 Intervention Type C - Graduated driver licensing and licence restrictions
A.5 Intervention Type D - Enforcement and restorative justice
A.6 Intervention Type E - Use of technology
A.7 Intervention Type F – Encouragement and leadership, including incentives and working with the private sector
Appendix B: Focus group topic guide
Appendix C: Online survey questionnaire
Appendix D: Summary of survey responses
D.1 Characteristics of respondents
D.2 Education and training for younger children and pre-drivers (and others)
D.3 Education and training for learners and novices
D.4 Graduated driver licensing and licence restrictions
D.5 Enforcement and restorative justice
D.6 Use of technology
Appendix E: Assessment of interventions
E.1 Assessment criteria
E.2 Assessment results


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