Transport Scotland Scottish Trunk Road Infrastructure Project Evaluation Evaluation Report for Trunk Road Projects Opened betwee

Contents   « Previous   Next »
Publication Date: 
30/01/2013

Transport Scotland Scottish Trunk Road Infrastructure Project Evaluation Evaluation Report for Trunk Road Projects Opened between April 07 and March 09

A APPENDIX A: EVALUATIONS FOR PROJECTS THAT OPENED BETWEEN APRIL 07 AND MARCH 09

A.7 A876(T) CLACKMANNANSHIRE BRIDGE

A.7.1 Introduction

Project Overview

The project involved the construction of a 4.0 kilometre bypass to the west of Kincardine including the Clackmannanshire Bridge and incorporated the upgrade of 2.4 kilometres of the A876 carriageway and grade separation of Bowtrees Roundabout.

The bypass comprises a wide single 2+1 (WS2+1) carriageway, providing a dedicated southbound overtaking opportunity over the bridge and a section of dedicated northbound overtaking opportunity to the north.

The general location of the project is indicated in Figure A.7a.

The A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project was officially opened to traffic on 19th November 2008.

Project Objectives

The objectives of the A876(T) Clackmannanshire project were set as follows:

  • to provide a cost effective solution to meet the reasonable needs of existing and future traffic crossing the Firth of Forth at Kincardine, whilst minimising the intrusion of roads and traffic on the communities in Fife, Clackmannan and Falkirk;
  • to aid economic prosperity and development in central Scotland and Fife, by reducing travel costs, particularly for business and commercial traffic serving existing and proposed business and commercial developments (including tourism);
  • to facilitate use of the crossing by public transport and non-motorised road users;
  • to improve the relative ease with which individuals can reach those destinations or amenities important to that person including but not limited to public transport, recreation areas, education and health facilities both in and around Kincardine;
  • to improve road safety and reduce, as far as practical, the risk and incidence of accidents involving vehicles on the A876(T)/ A985(T)/A977(T) trunk roads and non-motorised users in and around Kincardine;
  • to protect and improve the natural environment;

Figure A.7a A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge

Figure A.7a A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge

  • to improve the quality of life for residents living in Kincardine by reducing the effects of traffic in terms of noise and air pollution, whilst minimising the impact on the internationally important bird feeding and breeding grounds south and north of the Forth Estuary, which forms part of the Firth of Forth Special Protection Area (SPA), other communities in the study area, land use and landscaping;
  • to improve and develop local and express bus services, and integrate with the proposed reopening of the Stirling-Alloa-Kincardine railway line;
  • to optimise the relationship between the proposed scheme and land-use as identified in the structure plans; and
  • to maximise the improvement in transport links to employment, education and health for vulnerable groups to promote social inclusion.

Evaluation Methodology

The A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project has been evaluated against the above objectives and the following criteria:

  • Environment;
  • Safety;
  • Economy;
  • Integration;
  • Accessibility & Social Inclusion;
  • Costs to Government; and
  • Value for Money.

The evaluation is supported by the consideration of network traffic indicators, including traffic volumes presented in the following section.

A.7.2 Network Traffic Indicators

Traffic Volumes

Comparison Between Pre and Post Opening Traffic Flows

A study to quantify the impact of the Clackmannanshire Bridge on traffic patterns and volumes within the vicinity of the bridge and wider central Scotland area was undertaken six months after project opening.

The study concluded that the opening of the Clackmannanshire Bridge had little impact on the overall volume of cross‑Forth traffic (i.e. traffic using the A91, Clackmannanshire Bridge, Kincardine Bridge and Forth Road Bridge). It did, however, result in localised traffic flow changes - with total cross-Forth traffic in the Kincardine area increasing by approximately 8% (a corresponding fall being observed on the A91) whilst flows on the existing Kincardine Bridge reduced by approximately 52%.

The Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) flows pre and post project opening on the key routes within the study area from Transport Scotland's Automatic Traffic Counters (ATCs) are presented in Table A.7.1. The locations of the ATCs are shown in Figure A.7a.

Table A.7.1: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - ATC Data

Table A.7.1: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - ATC Data
ATC Reference AADT by Year
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge
JTC00508 - - Year of
Opening
14,396 14,272 14,878
Bypassed A977 (within Kincardine)
JTC00134 15,456 14,586 Year of
Opening
3,240 4,134 3,346
Bypassed A977 (North of Kincardine)
NTCPT003 15,895 15,291 Year of
Opening
4,562 4,351 4,409
A985 (East of Kincardine)
ATCPT006 2,995 3,273 Year of
Opening
3,230 2,932 N/A
M876(T) South of Kincardine Bridge
JTC00369 26,031 N/A Year of
Opening
26,135 25,195 26,596
A985(T) Kincardine Eastern Link Road
JTC00356 10,955 11,337 Year of
Opening
8,513 7,798 8,366
A907 West of Gartarry Roundabout (To/from Alloa, Clackmannan & Stirling)
NTCNT006 12,155 11,436 Year of
Opening
14,247 13,934 14,542
A907 East of Gartarry Roundabout (To/from Dunfermline)
NTCNT007 2,806 3,574 Year of
Opening
3,097 2,896 2,749
A977 North of Gartarry Roundabout (To/from M90(T))
JTC00136 5,913 5,798 Year of
Opening
6,009 5,822 N/A

Table A.7.1 indicates that Clackmannanshire Bridge carried around 14,400 vehicles per day (vpd) in 2009 with 3,200 vpd in Kincardine and 4,600 vpd on the bypassed A977 to the north of Kincardine. The M876(T) to the south of the Kincardine Bridge carried 26,100 vpd with 3,200 vpd on the A985 to the east of Kincardine and 8,500 vpd on the A985(T) Kincardine Eastern Link Road.

To the north of the Clackmannanshire Bridge, the A907 west of Gartarry Roundabout carried around 14,200 vpd in 2009, 6,000 vpd on the A977 to the north of the roundabout and 3,100 vpd on the A907 to the east.

A comparison between pre and post opening traffic volumes indicates that traffic flows in 2009 were around 11,300 vpd lower in Kincardine and 10,700 vpd lower on the A977 compared with 2007 flow levels, suggesting that traffic previously using the Kincardine Bridge and travelling through Kincardine onto the A977 is now using the new bridge.

While no traffic counters are located on the Kincardine Bridge itself, it can be deduced (from the counters on the M876(T) and the Clackmannanshire Bridge) that the Kincardine Bridge carried approximately 11,700 (i.e. 26,100 - 14,400) vpd in 2009, which is a reduction of around 55% compared to 2006 flow levels.

The traffic flow levels recorded on the M876(T) in 2009 are comparable with those recorded in 2006, which suggests that the opening of the Clackmannanshire Bridge has had little impact on the overall level of cross-Forth traffic flows in the Kincardine area.

Data for the Kincardine Eastern Link Road indicates that traffic flows in 2009 have reduced by around 2,800 vpd compared with 2007 flow levels, which suggests that traffic may now be using alternative routes (such as the Forth Road Bridge and M8(T)) for journeys between Central Scotland and Fife.

Data for the routes meeting at Gartarry Roundabout indicates that traffic flows on the A907 to the west and the A977 to the north in 2009 have increased by around 2,800 vpd and 200 vpd respectively compared with 2007 flow levels, which suggest that a greater volume of traffic from the west (Alloa and Clackmannan) and the north may be using the Clackmannanshire Bridge. Traffic flows have reduced by around 500 vpd on the A907 to the east of the roundabout in 2009 compared with 2007 flow levels, which suggests that traffic may now be using alternative routes (such as the Forth Road Bridge and M8(T)) for journeys between Central Scotland and Fife.

Comparison Between Actual and Predicted Traffic

The opening year flow comparisons for the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project is based on AADT flows from 2009 as this was the first full year of reliable traffic data available from Transport Scotland's traffic counters within the study area.

Predicted traffic flows for 2009 were derived by interpolating between the modelled assessment year, design network flows.

A summary of the actual and predicted traffic data is shown in Table A.7.2 below.

Table A.7.2: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Traffic Analysis Summary

Table A.7.2: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Traffic Analysis Summary
ATC
Ref
Actual AADT* Predicted AADT % Difference
(Predicted - Actual) / Actual
Low 60/40 High Low 60/40 High
A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge
JTC00508 14,396 20,493 20,833 21,344 42.4% 44.7% 48.3%
Bypassed A977 (North of Kincardine)
NTCPT003 4,562 1,058 1,067 1,081 -76.8% -76.6% -76.3%
A985(T) Kincardine Eastern Link Road
JTC00356 8,513 15,755 16,243 16,974 85.1% 90.8% 99.4%
A907 West of Gartarry Roundabout (To/from Alloa, Clackmannan & Stirling)
NTCNT006 14,247 14,145 14,366 14,697 -0.7% 0.8% 3.2%
A907 East of Gartarry Roundabout (To/from Dunfermline)
NTCNT007 3,097 4,554 4,628 4,738 47.0% 49.4% 53.0%
A977 North of Gartarry Roundabout (To/from M90(T))
JTC00136 6,009 8,648 8,823 9,085 43.9% 46.8% 51.2%

* 2009 flows (first full year of ATC data available)

The comparison between predicted and actual AADT flows in Table A.7.2 indicates that the predicted 2009 flows (derived by interpolating between the modelled assessment year traffic flows) were 42% and 48% greater than the observed 2009 flow on the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge, and 77% and 76% lower than the observed 2009 flow on the bypassed A977 north of Kincardine, under low and high traffic forecast scenarios respectively.

The comparison also indicates that the predicted 2009 flow was 85% to 99% greater than the observed 2009 flow on the Kincardine Eastern Link Road, 47% to 53% greater than the observed 2009 flow on the A907 to the east of Gartarry Roundabout and 44% to 51% greater than the observed 2009 flow on the A977 to the north of Gartarry Roundabout under low and high traffic forecast scenarios respectively. The predicted 2009 flow was consistent with the observed 2009 flow on the A907 to the west of Gartarry Roundabout.

The comparison between predicted and actual traffic flows in 2009 indicates significant variations in traffic flows on the various routes within the study area, with flows around 7,000 vpd lower than predicted using the Clackmannanshire Bridge and around 3,500 vpd higher than predicted using the bypassed A977 via Kincardine.

The comparison suggests that the forecast increase in strategic trips using the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge from the A985(T), A907 and A977 routes has not yet occurred, resulting in a lower than predicted traffic flow on the Clackmannanshire Bridge.

Carriageway Standard Assessment

A wide single 2+1 carriageway was constructed to bypass Kincardine, providing dedicated overtaking opportunities to help reduce journey times and improve journey time reliability.

An assessment of the carriageway standard according to TA 46/97 - Economic Assessment and Recommended Flow Ranges for New Rural Road Links, which applied at the time of the project design, is shown in Table A.7.3 based on the traffic flows observed on the bridge in 2009.

Table A.7.3: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Assessment of Carriageway Standard (TA 46/97)

Table A.7.3: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Assessment of Carriageway Standard (TA 46/97)
Opening Year AADT* TA46/97 Standard Constructed Standard
14,396 Wide Single
2-Lane
Wide Single
2+1

* 2009 flows (first full year of ATC data available)

The carriageway assessment indicates that the observed 2009 flow lies within the flow range appropriate for a wide single 2-lane standard of carriageway. There are no specific flow ranges for the justification of a wide single 2+1 carriageway given in TA 46/97 (or TD 70/80 - Design of Wide Single 2+1 Roads) and, given the potential benefits attributable to the provision of dedicated overtaking opportunities, the constructed carriageway standard is considered appropriate.

A.7.3 Environment

Review of Environmental Mitigation Measures

The environmental mitigation measures originally proposed for the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project were obtained from the project's Environmental Statement.

As part of the Environmental Impact Assessment process, a consultation with government agencies, non-governmental organisations and landowners was undertaken to inform interested parties of the proposals and to request comments and relevant information concerning the project. This exercise contributed to the identification of possible environmental impacts and the selection of appropriate mitigation measures. The following key issues were identified and have been addressed in the Environmental Impact Assessment and reported in the Environmental Statement:

  • Effects on saltmarsh, mudflat and estuarine birds;
  • Effects on flooding, water quality and the tidal movement within the Forth;
  • Nuisance to residents caused by increases in noise and vibration during construction and operation of the road;
  • Effects on landowners' accesses and access to existing and proposed pathways;
  • Impacts on the landscape and views due to the flatness of the area; and
  • Impacts on the areas and sites of historic importance.

A review of the environmental mitigation measures was carried out in March 2011, which confirmed that the majority of measures committed within the Environmental Statement were in place and were providing appropriate levels of mitigation. The key mitigation measures implemented as part of the project are as follows:

  • limits on the timing of construction to minimise disruption to wintering birds;
  • use of the existing landscape and topography to fit the project into the wider landscape;
  • noise mitigation measures at North Carse and Higgins' Neuk Roundabout;
  • Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) and attenuation ponds;
  • hedgerow and woodland planting;
  • specific measures for the protection of otters; and
  • provision of measures to facilitate the needs of pedestrians and cyclists.

Noise and Air Quality

Comparison Between Predicted and Actual Traffic Flows

The comparison between predicted and actual traffic flows within the study area (discussed in Section A.7.2) can be considered a proxy for the impact that the project is likely to have on noise and air quality.

Although the reduction in traffic within Kincardine has not been as significant as predicted during the project's preparation, it can be expected that the volume of traffic and congestion removed from within Kincardine will have a positive impact on noise and air quality for local residents. Whilst any improvement in noise and air quality within Kincardine and along the A985(T) could potentially be offset to some extent by localised changes in traffic elsewhere on the network, it is likely that the impact on noise and air quality along the A876(T) corridor in the vicinity of the Clackmannanshire Bridge will be less than predicted due to lower flows using the bridge than forecast during the project's preparation.

Noise surveys were undertaken for the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project during 2003 and 2009 to confirm the impact of the project on noise levels and compare post opening levels with those predicted during the project's preparation.

Whilst the surveys indicated that noise levels for some properties were higher than predicted, it was acknowledged that the properties were experiencing a significant improvement in noise levels and that the higher than predicted levels could not be attributed to the design of the project.

Environment: Key Findings

The review of mitigation measures implemented for the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project confirmed that the majority of measures committed within the Environmental Statement were in place. Whilst some variations from the proposed mitigation measures had been identified, these were not considered to have had a material detrimental impact on the general integration of the project into its surrounding.

Whilst noise levels for some properties were higher than predicted, it was acknowledged that the affected properties were experiencing a significant improvement in noise levels and the higher than predicted levels could not be attributed to the design of the project.

A.7.4 Safety

Accidents

Comparison Between Pre and Post Opening Personal Injury Accident Numbers

The locations and severities of personal injury accidents occurring within the vicinity of the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project 3 years before and 1 year after project completion are shown in Figures A.7b and A.7c.

A summary of the personal injury accident data is shown in Table A.7.4.

Table A.7.4: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Personal Injury Accident Data Summary

Table A.7.4: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Personal Injury Accident Data Summary
Period Fatal Serious Slight Total Accidents
3 Years Before
A876(T) 2 3 11 16
1 Year After
A876(T) 0 0 2 2
Bypassed A977 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 2 2

As can be seen Table A.7.4, two personal injury accidents (slight) occurred in the 1 year period following the opening of the project in comparison to sixteen personal injury accidents (two fatal, three serious and eleven slight) in the 3 years before opening, suggesting a significant improvement in road safety.

Road Safety Audits

The Stage 4 Road Safety Audit (RSA) was carried out in March 2010. The RSA report indicates that only one slight personal injury accident occurred in the 1 year after opening. The Stage 4 RSA report does not include the slight personal injury accident that occurred in the vicinity of the southern roundabout at Bowtrees Interchange and the reason for this can not be confirmed.

The accident considered within the report involved two vehicles. The RSA report indicates that the first vehicle, travelling southbound, collided with a safety barrier on the nearside of the road then crossed into the opposing carriageway, colliding with the second vehicle travelling northbound. Whilst the RSA report indicates that the accident may have been caused by the driver of the first vehicle being distracted by the views from the new bridge, it concludes that the project is operating safely and efficiently.

Six non-injury accidents within the vicinity of the project, which occurred during the 1 year period after opening, are also identified within the RSA report.

Figure A.7b A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge

Figure A.7b A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge

Figure A.7c A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge

Figure A.7c A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge

Safety: Key Findings

An assessment of the 1 year post opening personal injury accidents and a review of the Stage 4 RSA report, suggests that the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project is operating safely.

A.7.5 Economy

Transport Economic Efficiency

Comparison Between Predicted and Actual Traffic Flows

The comparison between predicted and actual traffic flows, presented in section A.7.2, can be considered a proxy for whether the predicted economic benefits of the project are likely to be realised.

The comparison indicates that the predicted 2009 flows were up to 48% greater than the observed 2009 flow on the new A876(T) and up to 77% less than the observed 2009 flow on the bypassed A977.

The comparison also indicates significant variations in traffic flows on a number of the main routes within the study area and suggests that forecast changes to the level of strategic trips using the A985(T), A907 and A977 routes have not yet occurred.

Economy: Key Findings

A general over prediction of traffic flows within the study area, in addition to an over prediction in the volume of traffic predicted to transfer from the bypassed route (through Kincardine) to the new crossing, suggests that the economic benefits of the project are likely to have been overestimated.

A.7.6 Integration

Transport Integration

An analysis of the opening year traffic flow composition from Transport Scotland's ATCs within the study area indicates that a number of bus services are using the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge. Examination of available data indicates that a number of these services are express bus services, serving the Clackmannanshire and wider Central Scotland area.

A number of bus services continue to use the Kincardine Bridge, serving Kincardine and the wider Fife area. Due to the reduction in traffic and congestion on the A985(T) route via the Kincardine Bridge, these bus services are likely to operate more efficiently.

Both the Clackmannanshire Bridge and the rail passenger service between Alloa and Stirling, introduced as part of the Stirling-Alloa-Kincardine Railway project, provide improved access to job opportunities in the local and wider areas, assisting in efforts to reduce long term unemployment within Clackmannanshire.

Transport and Land-Use Integration

The Clackmannanshire Council Structure Plan, applicable during the development of the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project, indicates that the proposal for a new crossing of the Forth at Kincardine was considered of major strategic importance to the economic regeneration of Clackmannanshire.

The regeneration and re-use of brownfield sites for strategic employment within the vicinity of the project are to be given priority and several sites were identified within the structure plan, such as Castlebridge Business Park (a former industrial site) to the north of Gartarry Roundabout.

Policy Integration

Due to the reduction in congestion and the subsequent reduction in journey times between Clackmannanshire, Fife and Central Scotland as a result of the new crossing, the Clackmannanshire Bridge, in conjunction with other transport improvement projects within Central Scotland, supports economic development in Clackmannanshire.

The project is providing lower and more reliable journey times, which is consistent with wider policy in respect of social inclusion.

Integration: Key Findings

The project supports the improvement of local and strategic bus services serving the Clackmannanshire and wider Central Scotland area.

The Clackmannanshire Bridge was built within the vicinity of brownfield sites (identified within the Clackmannanshire Council Structure Plan) to facilitate the regeneration and re-use of the sites for strategic employment.

A.7.7 Accessibility & Social Inclusion

Community and Comparative Accessibility

It can be expected that, as a result of lower journey times to key employment areas within Clackmannanshire and the wider Central Scotland area, the Clackmannanshire Bridge contributes positively towards reducing social exclusion within the local and wider region through improved access to employment and education opportunities, healthcare, shopping and leisure facilities.

Examination of available data indicates that bus services, which provide access for disabled travellers, operate via the Clackmannanshire Bridge to regional healthcare facilities within the Clackmannanshire area.

Improved facilities for cyclists, pedestrians and buses were provided as part of the contract, including a traffic free cycle link connecting with National Cycle Network Route 76 - St Andrews to Stirling and Edinburgh to Stirling.

Accessibility & Social Inclusion: Key Findings

The A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge contributes positively towards reducing social exclusion within the local and wider region through improved access to employment and education opportunities, healthcare, shopping and leisure facilities.

Observations from a site visit confirm that the project incorporates the planned measures for both cyclists and pedestrians.

A.7.8 Cost to Government

Investment Costs

Comparison Between Predicted and Out-turn Costs

The out-turn and predicted project costs are shown in Table A.7.5.

Table A.7.5: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Project Cost Summary

Table A.7.5: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Project Cost Summary
Out-turn Cost Predicted Cost Difference (Out-turn - Pred)
@ April 10 Mid-98 Prices in
1998 at 3.5% Discount
June 05 Prices Mid-98 Prices in
1998 at 3.5% Discount
Mid-98 Prices in
1998 at 3.5% Discount
Total £124,397,456 £73,777,589 £122,095,000 £77,183,890 -£3,406,301
(5%)

Cost to Government: Key Findings

The out-turn cost of the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project is approximately £3.4m (5%) lower than was predicted at the time of assessment.

A.7.9 Value for Money

Initial Indications

The economic appraisal results for the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project predicted a Net Present Value (NPV) of £41.27m and Benefit to Cost Ratio (BCR) of 1.53 under the 60/40 traffic forecast scenario.

Based on the comparisons presented in sections A.7.5 and A.7.8, which suggest that the benefits will have been overestimated and indicate that the cost is lower than predicted, it is judged that the NPV and BCR of the project is unlikely to be as great as predicted.

Value for Money: Key Findings

Although the NPV and BCR are unlikely to be as great as predicted at the time of assessment, it is judged that the project will continue to provide a benefit to road users.

A.7.10 Achievement of Objectives

As specific indicators to measure the performance of the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project against its objectives have not been developed, an initial indication of how the project is progressing towards achieving its objectives is based on the pre opening data available, supplemented by post opening data collected as part of the evaluation.

Initial Indications

A summary of the evaluation, providing an indication of how the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge project is progressing towards achieving its objectives, is presented in Table A.7.6.

Table A.7.6: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Progress Towards Achieving Objectives

Table A.7.6: A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge - Progress Towards Achieving Objectives

Objective

Commentary

Progress

To provide a cost effective solution to meet the reasonable needs of existing and future traffic crossing the Firth of Forth at Kincardine, whilst minimising the intrusion of roads and traffic on the communities in Fife, Clackmannan and Falkirk.

Although the NPV and BCR are unlikely to be as great as predicted at the time of assessment, it is judged that the project will continue to provide a benefit to road users.

The impact of the project on Kincardine, in terms of roads and traffic is positive and the effect on communities outwith the immediate area is negligible.

+ve

To aid economic prosperity and development in central Scotland and Fife, by reducing travel costs, particularly for business and commercial traffic serving existing and proposed business and commercial developments (including tourism).

The provision of a new Forth crossing at Kincardine has contributed towards a reduction in congestion within the local area, and can be expected to result in a subsequent reduction in journey times and improvement in journey time reliability for cross-Forth traffic travelling between Clackmannanshire, Fife and Central Scotland.

It is likely to benefit commercial traffic and achieve wide economic benefits.

+ve

To facilitate use of the crossing by public transport and non-motorised road users.

Improved facilities for cyclists, pedestrians and buses were provided as part of the contract, including, a traffic free cycle path connected with the National Cycle Network Route.

A number of bus services are using the A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge and the journey times of bus services will have improved.

+ve

To improve the relative ease with which individuals can reach those destinations or amenities important to that person including but not limited to public transport, recreation areas, education and health facilities both in and around Kincardine.

A significant volume of traffic has been removed from within the town of Kincardine (approximately 10,000 vehicles per day), and that will have reduced impacts relating to severance as a result of high traffic volumes and, subsequently, will have improved accessibility to services for local residents.

+ve

To improve road safety and reduce, as far as practical, the risk and incidence of accidents involving vehicles on the A876(T)/A985(T)/A977(T) trunk roads and non-motorised users in and around Kincardine.

2 slight accidents occured on the A876(T) with no accidents reported to have occurred on the bypassed A977 or A985(T) in the 1 year period following the opening of the project in comparison to 2 fatal, 3 serious and 11 slight accidents on the A876(T) in the 3 years before opening suggesting a significant improvement in road safety.

The project has also removed traffic from Kincardine, reducing the potential for accidents occurring that involve non-motorised users.

+ve

To protect and improve the natural environment.

Mitigation measures should ensure that the project is unlikely to have more than a moderately significant impact on ecology, including the ecology of the nationally and internationally designated Firth of Forth Special Protection Area.

O

To improve the quality of life for residents living in Kincardine by reducing the effects of traffic in terms of noise and air pollution, whilst minimising the impact on the internationally important bird feeding and breeding grounds south and north of the Forth Estuary, which forms part of the Forth of Forth SPA, other communities in the study area, land use and landscaping.

A substantial number of properties in Kincardine are likely to experience an improvement in air quality and reduced noise levels as a consequence of removing a significant volume of traffic from within the town, although it is acknowledged that is some cases, the level of noise reduction is lower than forecast.

The majority of mitigation measures committed within the Environmental Statement were in place. Whilst some variations from the proposed mitigation measures had been identified, these were not considered to have had a material detrimental impact on the general integration of the project into its surroundings.

+ve

To improve and develop local and express bus services and integrate with the proposed reopening of the Stirling-Alloa-Kincardine railway line.

The Clackmannanshire Bridge provides a more direct route for express buses serving the Clackmannanshire and wider central Scotland area, providing opportunities for improving local services, which continue to use the Kincardine Bridge.

Both the Clackmannanshire Bridge and the rail passenger service between Alloa and Stirling, provide improved access to job opportunities outside the area, assisting in efforts to reduce long term unemployment in Clackmannanshire.

+ve

To optimise the relationship between the proposed scheme and land-use as identified in the structure plans.

The A876(T) Clackmannanshire Bridge was built within the vicinity of brownfield sites identified within the Clackmannanshire Council Structure Plan - the regeneration and re-use of which for strategic employment would be given priority.

+ve

To maximise the improvement in transport links to employment, education and health for vulnerable groups to promote social inclusion.

The new crossing supports economic development in Clackmannanshire and reduces social exclusion in Fife more generally through improved access to employment and education opportunities, healthcare, shopping and leisure facilities as a result of reduced and more reliable journey times between Clackmannanshire, Fife and Central Scotland.

Bus services, cycle lanes and footpaths have been improved/catered for.

=

Key:
+ve Initial indication(s) that objective may be achieved

= Progress towards achievement of objective cannot be confirmed

O Initial indication(s) that objective may not be achieved


j257689-12.htm

Contents   « Previous   Next »